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Forum Name: Valvular Heart Diseases

Question: MVP/Chest Pain


 Trojan - Thu Mar 02, 2006 3:27 pm

Hello,
I was diagnosed w/ MVP around 1995.
I had felt my heart beating irregularly especially at night time.
Then I started working out by lifting weights, w/o cario exercises. That was when I first got a checkup. 1st doctor told me my heart wasn't getting the correct signal. Then after ultrasound, he said it was MVP and told me to stop working out.
So do my dismay, I stopped working out. A second doctor told me I had MVP, but working out should be okay, even w/ weights.
But I had stopped working out just in case. Until recently, my heart seemed okay, but since about 2 years ago I've been getting out of shape w/ my belly growing. I've been snoring louder (snoring started around 1995). I'm constantly tired. So I started working out again, this time w/ 20 min. of cardio everyday, and lifting weights for about a month now, resting about 2 days a week. I am having small throbbing, annoying left chest pain area and a bit on the left arm and sometimes at finger tips - usually in the morning. And my irregular heart beat has started up again. I am 33 yrs old. I lost about 5 lbs in the last month of workout and have been told that I've been snoring less.
I've also been watching my diet. I weigh about 165 lbs now at height of 5'8. I will be going to get a checkup. I'm worried about the chest pain, and whether I should stop working out again. I love working out and having to stop again would depress me (it depressed me the first time). Is the pain related to my heart/workout, and should I stop the work out? I would hate to just do cardio workout and not do any heavy weight lifting.
Your advice would be much appreciated. My apologies for such a long post. Thank you in advance.

I
 Theresa Jones, RN - Mon Mar 06, 2006 6:47 am

User avatar Hi Trojan,
My question for you, do your experience the discomfort/pain when you do the cardio workout? You may want to assess if you experience these symptoms without the heavy weight lifting. If you do not experience pain when you do the cardio workout alone then you may have to temporarily compromise until you have your physical evaluation to identify the source of the chest pain. I would strongly encourage you to have an evaluation.
Sincerely,
Theresa Jones, RN
 Trojan - Mon Mar 06, 2006 7:27 pm

Hello and thank you. here's the update after seeing the doctor.
i was wrong, i don't have mitral valve prolapse. i have mitral valve regurgitation..oops. he says 80% of the population have this, that it is "normal" to have some leak..and that it is nothing to worry about..that it's nothing serious...
as for the pain, he says it may be due to stress, but that we'll discuss more whan the results come back. we did an EKG, stress test, and ultrasound...he says, heart is healthy, slight leak, size normal....and that it is okay to work out..cardio and weight lifting. delighted as i am to hear that i can work out, i don't feel too comforatable wtih this answer...as the pain and occasional hard skipping of the beat does not feel "normal". sometimes i'm short of breath..which i think i failed to mention to the doctor. i guess we'll know more when the blood test comes back. and my heart acts up sometimes during cardio, sometimes during lifting...sometimes when i'm doing absolutely nothing, or when i'm about to go to bed. maybe i need to do an MRI...what could it be?...
 John Kenyon, CNA - Wed Jul 16, 2008 11:19 pm

User avatar Hi trojan -

Your follow up deserves a follow up. Here it is: your doctor is correct that the finding of mild mitral regurgitation without valvular malfunction is extremely normal, as the mitral valve has rather large leaflets. A little jet of blowback is perfectly normal, but is noted, along with everything else that's found to be less-than-perfect. The problem is the patient somehow finds this out and starts worrying about it. Trust me, this is also very common, but you have no need to worry about it, and this is why lay people really ought not be handed clinical reports unless the doctor has the time to spend explaining all the normal stuff in them.

As for your heart "acting up" it sounds as though you are having occasional premature beats, which are also absolutely normal and have no diagnostic value at all, especially in a heart found to be otherwise normal. However, they can be very unsettling because of the sensation. What may surprise you is that some people have these very frequently and don't feel them at all, while other people have them rather rarely but feel every one (and there may be some rhyme and reason in that, since the more often a thing happens the more likely we are to tune it out). At any rate, I hope this clears up some of your lingering concerns about your heart's health. It sounds as though it is itself very healthy and the things you're feeling are also, oddly enough, totally normal (and almost universal as well).

Enjoy your good health.

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