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Forum Name: Heart Failure

Question: enlarged right ventricle


 dadof6 - Tue Sep 18, 2007 9:18 am

37yr old male, used to be an athlete but no serious exercising in several years
marked bradycardia 45
mother had mi at 55
no meds
recent echo said mild mitral regurge, a trace of tricuspid regure, enlarged right ventricle, ejction fraction of 64%, all other findings were within normal limits
no physical symptoms
what is going on with my heart and what should be done next, should I be exercising?
 Dr. Chan Lowe - Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:57 pm

User avatar Hi Dadof6,

I would recommend that you continue to follow up with your cardiologist to further evaluate this. Your ejection fraction is normal and trace tricuspid regurge is probably a non-issue.

If you're having other symptoms you may need some further testing to see if everything is OK.

It is probably OK to exercise but I would advise you to ask your cardiologist about this first since he has all the details of your case.

Best wishes.
 dadof6 - Mon Dec 10, 2007 8:31 am

I had a stress test that was negative, also no sign of pulm hypertension, my right ventricle is 3.3cm, my cardiologist said that I should not be concerned about the enlarged right vent at this time, I am concerned about cardiomyopathy related to the enlrged right vent later in life, is this finding very common and is it likely that cardiomyopathy lurks in my future
thanks
 John Kenyon, CNA - Sat Jul 19, 2008 12:01 pm

User avatar Hello dadof6 -

I just wanted to catch up on your appended question here. While an enlarged right ventricle is not a normal finding, it is neither terribly unusual nor always problematic. Cardiomyopathy can of course affect the RV, but generally has a more serious effect on the LV. There are one or two congenital conditions involving a thin RV free wall and some enlargement, but it often causes the patient no problem, although it should be followed over time. I think the concern over cardiomyopathy can probably be safely put on a back burner for now, and quite possibly for good. Just be sure you have an occasional look taken at this. It could also be an anomaly which will not show up next time.

Hope this will ease your concerns.

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