News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter   
 

 Headlines:

 
 

Doctors Lounge - Cardiology Answers

"The information provided on www.doctorslounge.com is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between a patient/site visitor and his/her physician."

Back to Cardiology Answers List

Forum Name: Cardiology Symptoms

Question: Maximum heart rate in exercise, age 61


 txdon - Sat Nov 08, 2008 7:47 pm

I participate in a 1 hour high intensity workout in a group setting. I watch my heart rate increase to 160-165 and then slow down. There is no pain but I worry about getting the rate too high. I have no significant health problems or history. I work out 3 to 4 times per week. My resting heart rate is at 46-50. My dad lived to 94 with progressive heart failure. He had a pacemaker for his last 10 years. I've been told that I have an "extra click" in my heart beat. What should I know and do?
 John Kenyon, CNA - Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:29 am

User avatar Hello -

First, as to your maximum heart rate, yours does seem to be just a tad high, but of course these things are not actually hard and fast rules, although we try to draw a line somewhere, Actually, using the standard formula, your maximum should now be 159, and of course you're just barely above that. However, the usual goal is 75-90% of maximum. Again, however, you're doing a high intensity program, and for one hour, so you're pretty athletic, and your resting rate demonstrates this, as you have typical "runner's bradycardia" or an unusually slow resting rate. This is actually quite normal for your fitness level.

It sounds as though all this is close enough to right so that without any symptoms you are probably in excellent condition.

As for that "extra click", I would have to assume this referred to a click murmur, which is characteristic of mitral valve prolapse (MVP), which is an extremely common and generally very benign condition that is so prevalent among the general population that it is often considered a "variant of normal." The only reason you're even aware of it is because you were told about the click, and this is done only because doctors have an obligation to note anything not strictly by-the-book-normal, even though MVP is controversial in some circles as even being abnormal. It doesn't seem to be affecting you at all, so it can safely be ignored.

All in all you sound like someone who is remarkably fit and healthy, and that it runs in your family, which is another plus.

Hope this is helpful. Best of luck to you and keep up the good work!

|

Check a doctor's response to similar questions

 

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us

 
Copyright © 2001-2010
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME Articles

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

We subscribe to the HONcode principles of the HON Foundation. Click to verify.We subscribe to the HONcode principles.
Verify here