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Forum Name: Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

Question: Atrial septal aneurysm and pregnant.


 Carter11788 - Wed Sep 16, 2009 10:42 pm

Hi my nickname is carter,

I have a atrial septal aneurysm with no asd or pfo ( no defects at all) and very low pulmonary hypertention in the 20 percentile. I am wondering is this something that is worthy of worrying for while im pregnant? And can I keep my pregnancy and live through it?. im in my second trimester (16 weeks )im very scared do these symptoms pose a threat while pregnant. I have had no shortness of breath. Ive looked all over google and bing and yahoo and cant find anything but about the defect. Please answer im kinda worried. I'll be seeing my cardiologist on the 24th this month.
 John Kenyon, CNA - Thu Oct 22, 2009 10:26 pm

User avatar Hello -- You will by now have seen your cardiologist, who is best equipped to answer your question, but I'll try to work with you anyway. The atrial septal aneurysm is usually not a problem unless it eventually causes pulling of nerve tissues which can cause atrial arrhythmias (which can usually be managed with conservative treatment if necessary, if they even occur). The notion of aneurysm, in this case, is not like that of an artery, which are prone to burst. The pressures on either side of the septum are pretty much equal, so this is merely a separation of septal tissue, forming a small void space. It doesn't usually cause any serious problems as there is no place for anything to go. It's more an anatomical anomaly which must be noted and should not be affected (or affect) your pregnancy.

The PH is another matter, but since it is currently mild it will likely be considered a minor risk for pregnancy, although the pregnancy and delivery could cause it to become more severe afterward. If so, it would have to be followed closely, but it should be followed regularly anyway, as it can often progress on its own anyway. This is something of greater concern, although it may just as easily remain stable or even improve with time. Pregnancy could, as I've said, make it worsen, but not likely something that would show up til afterward. It should be tracked carefully during pregnancy, however, and especially during delivery. A Cesarian delivery may be considered for someone with low grade PH (cor pulmonale).

I hope this helps answer your concerns. Please follow up with us here as needed. Good luck to you!

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