Advertisement
 

doctorslounge.com

 
Powered by
Careerbuilder

 

                    Home  |  Forums  |  Humor  |  Advertising  |  Contact
   Ask a Doctor

   News via RSS

   Newsletter

   Cardiology

   News

   Conferences

   CME

   Forum Archives

   Diseases

   Symptoms

   Labs

   Procedures

   Drugs

   Links
   Specialties

   Cardiology

   Dermatology

   Endocrinology

   Fertility

   Gastroenterology

   Gynecology

   Hematology

   Infections

   Nephrology

   Neurology

   Oncology

   Orthopedics

   Pediatrics

   Pharmacy

   Primary Care

   Psychiatry

   Pulmonology

   Rheumatology

   Surgery

   Urology

   Other Sections

   Membership

   Research Tools

   Medical Tutorials

   Medical Software

 

 Headlines:

 
 

Back to Cardiovascular Procedures

Heart-lung machine

Cardiac pump

A cardiac pump or cardiac bypass pump or heart-lung machine temporarily takes over the function of breathing and pumping blood for a patient.

It generally has two parts, the pump and the aerator.

The pump is usually several motor-driven rollers that peristaltically massage a tube made of silicone rubber. The massage pushes the blood through the tubing.

The aerator varies, but usually is either a drip onto a sterile surface, or passage through a silicone-membrane simulated lung.

Cardiac pumps are most often used in heart surgery, so that a patient's heart can be disconnected from the body for longer than the twenty minutes or so it takes a prepared patient to die. Although unprepared patients get brain damage in three to four minutes, and patient can be prepared by cooling and drugs so that no damage will occur for twenty minutes or more. Cardiac pumps are also sometimes used to keep babies with birth defects alive, or to aerate bodies with transplantable organs.

Chronic use of cardiac pumps is contraindicated because the pressure profile of most practical pumps is believed to cause circulatory damage to the brain, especially in extended use. The pumps generate continuous pressure. When this pressure is set high enough to aerate tissues in the foot, it can easily damage tissue in the brain. Likewise, if set low enough to avoid damaging the brain, it often under-aerates some part of the body, such as the feet.

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a doctor or a nurse?

Do you want to join the Doctors Lounge online medical community?

Participate in editorial activities (publish, peer review, edit) and give a helping hand to the largest online community of patients.

Click on the link below to see the requirements:

Doctors Lounge Membership Application


previous.gif (72x17 -- 347 bytes) next.gif (72x17 -- 277 bytes)

 

 

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 



We subscribe to the HONcode principles of the HON Foundation. Click to verify.
We subscribe to the HONcode principles. Verify here

Privacy Statement | Terms & Conditions | Editorial Board | About us
Copyright 2001-2012 DoctorsLounge. All rights reserved.