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Forum Name: Asthma

Question: trouble breathing


 finagel666 - Sat Oct 08, 2005 10:22 pm

Hello. I have been having difficulty breathing. Like when I am crying I hyperventalate. And for some reason it seems I can only slow the breathing down by covering my mouth with my hand. One night while sleeping I woke up choking. I could inhale but could not breathe out. Well I went to the doctor's and the doctor told me I have chronic allergies and a hyperreactive airway. So II decided to do some research online about the hyperreactive airway and kept coming up with asthma. But the doctor told something that my hypereactive airway disease could trigger asthma. So now I am confused is the hyperreactive airway disease just another name for asthma? And if not what are the differences between the two?

Thanks for your time
 dsjeya - Sun Oct 09, 2005 11:43 am

all that wheezes r not asthma but in your case it seems,because inspiration near normal expiraton difficult o.k what is in the name
 John Kenyon, CNA - Fri Jul 25, 2008 9:18 pm

User avatar Hello -

Inhaling but having difficulting exhaling is pretty much the technical definition of the mechanism of asthma, as the upper airway and bronchial tree become narrowed due to either irritation, allergy or autoimmune response (usually linked to emotions). You pretty well describe asthma, and your doctor has apparently tried to avoid a definitive diagnosis by suggesting hyperactive upper airway, which simply means your airway is hypersensitive -- and you have episodes of asthma. The "hypersensitive" part is really redundant. While it's not precisely another name for asthma, the result is the same, and some doctors prefer to break down the diagnosis to this extreme. The end result is the same, the treatment is the same, and when you cannot exhale easily it is because you are experiencing asthma. Due to what is open to question, but the treatment of the acute problem still remains the same. There is really no functional difference between the two.

Hope this is helpful. Good luck to you.

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