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Forum Name: Dermatology Topics

Question: Crescent shaped wrinkle/depression below eyes/upper cheeks


 nohello2u - Thu Nov 12, 2009 3:32 am

I am 24 year male, recently i have developed facial marks below both eyes which are like crescent shaped depressions in the skin,like this :
http://img7.imageshack.us/img7/4147/crescentm.jpg

They are about 1/2 inch below from each eye hollow, so they can not be eye hollows.

Which become more noticable and ugly when there is an overhead light source.
1. how to get rid of them naturally ? any facial exercises or homemade treatments ? any safe creams ?
2. what is this mark called ? it would help me to look out for more literature regarding this. I think this is not called "maler crescent" which is something similar. Specific term for mark i have ??

The skin below the mark also seems harder than rest of surrounding area.or feels like may be some thin spacing between two muscles
 Dr.M.Aroon kamath - Sun Jul 11, 2010 10:57 am

User avatar Hi,
I wonder if you are referring to the " Arcus Deformity"- also variously called as the "tear trough deformity" or "crescent deformity".This usually presents around 30-35 years of age and worsens during the 40's and 50's. It appears as a dark crescent shaped line or depression(convex downwards) which occurs inferior to the lower eyelid, begining close to the nose & the inner corner of the eye, dipping downward into the mid-face and then running out toward the side of the face and curving upwards.

Two factors seem to result in this appearance.
- sagging of the orbicularis oculi muscles and
- sagging of the buccal pad of fat(herniation of the buccal pad of fat).

The depression that you indicate, is a common feature in this condition and is thought to be caused by the attachment of the "arcus marginalis ligament" that attaches the skin in the mid-face area to the upper part of the cheek bones. Often,the innermost portion of the Arcus Deformity (near the nose), tends to be the deepest and most troublesome part.

On the other hand,the "malar crescent" is a crescent-shaped fullness corresponds to the lower-eyelid muscle (orbicularis oculi muscle) and occurs along the upper part of the cheek.The lower border of this bulge corresponds to the lower border of the orbicularis oculi muscle. This is a common sequel to aging.

One other condition that deserves mention in this context is the "dark circles under eyes", commonly seen in young individuals in their 20's and 30's.This condition also may exhibit some features similar to the arcus deformity (a depression). But, this depression does not dip downwards into the mid-face. There is no sagging of the buccal pad of fat. With aging, this may worsen and go on to form the arcus.

The photograph supplied is not of very high resolution but, my guess would be that it appears more in favor of "dark circles under the eyes".

A thorough, first-hand evaluation by a dermatologist would be the ideal way to diagnose your condition with certainty.
Best wishes!

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