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Forum Name: Dermatology Topics

Question: Callus over former surgery spot


 KielMan316 - Tue Aug 17, 2010 10:34 pm

Many years ago, I was at home at night when I ran up a flight of carpeted stairs. I was barefoot, and the stairwell was dark. When I reached the top of the stairs, I stepped on a sewing needle that I didn't know or see. The sewing needle broke in two and one half was stuck inside my foot (near my pinky toe). It was very painful, and the next morning my mother took me to the emergency room. The doctor performed a minor surgical procedure to remove the sewing needle that was inside the ball of my foot. It was explained to me that because a foreign object entered my body, the incision would be left open to heal on its own instead stitches. Over the years that surgical spot has developed a small callus. Over the last year or so, the callus has gotten slightly worse. It is not painful nor does it itch. I asked my father what he thought, and he suggested that it might be a wart. I have had warts before, and I don't feel that it's a wart. Normally I don't get concerned over calluses because they are considered normal. I am only concerned because it's developed over a former surgical spot, and perhaps that could mean that the incision didn't heal properly. I understand that because I do a lot of walking in my job, it's probably not surprising that a callus would develop there. Is there reason to be concerned and should I see a doctor about it?
 Dr.M.Aroon kamath - Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:45 am

User avatar Hi,
There are 3 major pressure points on the sole of the each foot while standing. They are,
- the ball of the big toe,
- ball of the little toe, and
- the heel.

The balls of other toes and tips of the toes also contribute to weight bearing during the different phases of normal gait. Punctured wounds are best left unsutured after thorough cleaning/debridement.

The swelling that you describe, may be a callosity. Callosities occur in weight bearing areas and areas prone to friction. They may also occur due to underlying abnormal bony prominences. The callosity may or may not be related to the past injury. The main concern in weight bearing areas is a painful scar. Scars in weight bearing areas often tend to be painful and tender. Fortunately, in your case, the swelling is apparently painless.

You should consult an orthopedic surgeon and have yourself examined. An X-ray of the foot is useful in excluding abnormal bony projections. In the absence of that, local keratolytic cremes and well special pressure-relieving footwear will be helpful.
Good luck!

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