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Forum Name: Endocrinology Topics

Question: low growth during puberty


 ytyhy8 - Mon Dec 18, 2006 4:17 pm

I am male 25 yrs old and short (5 7’), but I was 5 4’ beginning at age 13, and only grew 3 inches since then to reach my adult height. According to the growth chart, this drops me from the 75th height percentile then to the 20th today. My brother and father are both tall (6 1' and 5 11' respectively) - my mother and sister are average height for women. How unusual is this, and could it have been caused by a hormonal deficiency? I am also having a lot of ED problems today, which may or may not be psychological.

Also, is this something my pediatrician should have done something about at the time? He noticed at one point that I'd "stopped growing" but said it was just normal and my body was "done." Was that a reasonable/typical response?

Other sexual maturity characteristics - I have lots of pubic hair but almost no hair on the rest of my body (face, arms, legs, chest). I am very skinny and have a sleight build, narrow shoulders, and no muscles. I suffered some testicular trauma when i was 12 - my scrotum was punctured by a chain link fence and I received two stitches. I’ve also had a lot of severe anxiety problems since adolescence.

Any advice would be much appreciated. Thank you.
 Dr. Safaa Mahmoud - Tue Dec 19, 2006 5:27 pm

User avatar Hello,

A delayed puberty is usually associated with short stature.
Delayed sexual development is defined as no testicular enlargement by 14 years of age or the passing of five years between the initial and complete development of the genitalia.

One of the causes is gonadal dysfunction. Since you have a history of trauma and surgery to testicles, this cause should be excluded.

In boys, hypogonadism results in lack of muscle and beard development and growth problems. In men the usual complaints are sexual dysfunction, decreased beard and body hair, breast enlargement, and muscle loss.

Tests include testosterone level (men) as well as FSH level and LH level, sperm count; blood tests for anemia.

Direct clinical examination is essential.
Best regards.

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