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Forum Name: Endocrinology Topics

Question: Thyroid test results


 liz1965 - Sat Mar 10, 2007 12:25 pm

I’m a 42 year old female with a question regarding the results blood work done to test for thyroid problems. In February of 06, my TSH was 2.22 and my free T4 was 1.11. Tests for antibodies were negative (thyroblob < 20, ref: < 25; microsomal 1.4, ref: 0.- 2.0).

I was tested again in August of 2006 with the following results. THS = 2.54, thyroid peroxidase antibodies 10 (ref: < 35). At this time it was noted that my thyroid was slightly enlarged.

Both doctors (my GP and an endocrinologist) indicated that my thyroid was functioning normally. However, I seem to have a lot of the symptoms of hypothyroidism, including problems with blood sugar regulation (reactive hypoglycemia), paresthesia, and an extreme sensitivity to cold. Recently I noticed that the bottom part of each eyebrow is missing, which I’ve read can be a sign of hypothyroidism. I’m also losing eyelashes at an alarming rate.

I’ve read postings on this site and others that state that a TSH over 2.5 is most likely indicative of a problem. How does one go about finding a doctor who will treat an elevated TSH that’s below the cutoff of 5.00? I wonder if this is something worth pursuing (I don’t think it will be easy), or are my numbers really within normal parameters?

Thanks,
 Dr. Chan Lowe - Sat Mar 10, 2007 11:16 pm

User avatar Each lab has its own set of normal ranges for tests; however, in general a TSH between 0.4 and 4 is normal. T4 has a wider range. It is possible for one to have an elevated TSH and a normal T4. In your case, both the TSH and T4 are normal. This makes thyroid dysfunction extremely unlikely.

You may consider having some of your other hormones checked, such as cortisol and growth hormone. Decrease amounts of these hormones, particularly cortisol, can lead to many similar symptoms of hypothyroidism. Cortisol deficiency can lead to hypoglycemia as it is one of the hormones that counteracts insulin.

Regarding finding a doctor that will treat hypothyroidism in you, I can't be of any help. I'm not aware of any. Sorry.

Hope this helps.

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