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Forum Name: Endocrinology Topics

Question: Evaluating Blood Test Results


 trodigy - Thu Jul 05, 2007 1:25 pm

I am a 34 year old male that recently had blood work taken for life insurance, in reading the results from the lab, all seems relatively normal except for a very high AST(SGOT) reading of 50, the test indicates the range should be 0-33.

I do not smoke, or take drugs and drink only moderately.

I have a family history of heart disease with my father having just had quadruple bypass surgery.... Should I be concerned with this reading, and what if anything can I do to lower it?
 Dr. Chan Lowe - Thu Jul 05, 2007 4:10 pm

User avatar 50 is actually only minimally elevated and can be from any number of causes. Since it's for life insurance they will likely ask questions about it. As such, you may need to have it rechecked in a few weeks to ensure it has resolved (as likely it will).

Best wishes.

(By the way, a more significant elevation would be in the 200-300 range or even higher like the thousands.)
 cdc57 - Fri Feb 15, 2008 2:28 am

I recently had opposing tests results from both blood and saliva samples for my testosterone levels. I'm a 43 year old male who has been taking a testosterone supplement (Androgel) for low testosterone most of my adult life. The last three saliva test over the past eight months showed consistent beyond upper readable limits for testosterone, while the blood test showed low levels.

I went on line and found this article:
http://smartlifeforum.org/toolateschmar ... -blood.htm

And here are two telling paragraphs from the article

STEROID HORMONES IN THE BLOOD

Let us use testosterone as an example that is representative of all steroid hormones. Over 90% of the testosterone in the bloodstream is carried by water-soluble proteins (sex hormone binding globulin [SHBG] and albumin). The testosterone bound to those proteins is not readily bioavailable to target tissues because it is on its way to the liver for excretion in bile which enters the intestines when fat is eaten. Along the intestines, about 90% of the bile and testosterone is reabsorbed and recycled to the liver for new processing - thus conserving these valuable biochemicals.

Part of the testosterone-SHBG and testosterone- albumin complexes that went to the liver is converted into water-soluble chemicals that are excreted in the urine. Sometimes, a urine specimen is used to estimate the testosterone in the blood.
Less than 10% of total testosterone is bioavailable. More than 80% of this bioavailable (called "free") testosterone travels in the blood attracted to (adsorbed on) fatty red blood cell membranes. The other 20% of bioavailable testosterone (2% of total testosterone) is unbound traveling in the plasma, and is readily available to stimulate target tissues.


So are current blood tests (serum) not the proper test for people who take external hormones? I heard from Androgel that they did all their testing with blood samples.

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