News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter   
 

 Headlines:

 
 

Doctors Lounge - Endocrinology Answers

"The information provided on www.doctorslounge.com is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between a patient/site visitor and his/her physician."

Back to Endocrinology Answers List

Forum Name: Endocrinology Topics

Question: Test results for thyroid and hormones, unsure of diagnosis


 kimbers25 - Tue Aug 07, 2007 2:35 am

Hello I am a 26 year old female who has had symptoms of adrenal fatigue, and alternating hyper and hypo thyroidism. The list of symptoms is very long but if it will help please let me know and I will be happy to post them. I do have a grandmother with graves disease. I also have low body temperature.

Here are my results of a thyroid panel done a couple of months ago:

TSH 1.892 uIU/mL 0.350-5.500
Thyroxine (T4) 5.3 ug/dl 4.5-12.0
T3 Uptake 32 % 24-39
Free Thyroxine Index 1.7 1.2-4.9


And these are the results of the saliva and bloodspot tests I had done a week ago:

Estradiol (saliva) 1.8 normal is 1.3-3.3
Progesterone (saliva) 174 normal is 75-270
Ratio pg/E2 (saliva) 97 L optimal is 100-500
Testosterone (saliva) 17 normal is 16-55
DHEAS (saliva) 7.2 normal is 2-23
Cortisol morning (saliva) 4.8 normal is 3.7-9.5
Cortisol noon (saliva) 1.7 normal is 1.2-3.0
Cortisol evening (saliva) 1.1 normal is 0.7-2.5
Cortisol night (saliva) 0.4 normal is 0.4-1.0
Free T4 (bloodspot) 1.1 normal is 0.7-2.5
TSH (bloodspot) 1.8 normal is 0.5-3.0
TPO (bloodspot) 60 normal is 0-150 (borderline 70-150)

Any insight into these results would be great! I'm especially curious about the TPO.

Thanks so much!
 Dr. Chan Lowe - Mon Aug 13, 2007 7:00 pm

User avatar Hi Kimbers25,

Essentially all your studies are normal. In particular, your TSH and T4 are normal, making the thyroid unlikely to be causing your symptoms.

The TPO (or thyroid peroxidase) antibodies are antibodies against the thyroid gland. If they are elevated enough they can damage the thyroid gland causing an autoimmune thyroiditis.

Your levels are not particularly concerning although it may be useful to test them again in several months.

Unfortunately, based on these tests you have not found the cause of your symptoms. I would recommend you continue to follow up with your doctor for further evaluation.

Best wishes.

|

Check a doctor's response to similar questions

 

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us

 
Copyright © 2001-2010
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME Articles

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

We subscribe to the HONcode principles of the HON Foundation. Click to verify.We subscribe to the HONcode principles.
Verify here