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Forum Name: Endocrinology Topics

Question: Night sweats, frequent night urniation, and chest discomfort


 dosiedoe - Sat Mar 28, 2009 1:26 pm

I'm a 32 year old female. For the past 6 weeks I've been waking up covered in sweat almost every night. I've also been experiencing a feeling in my chest, not really pain but slight discomfort that was not present before. My blood pressure the last two doctors visits was 135/95, thats the highest i've ever had. I had a tooth implant put in right around the time these symptoms started so it can be related. I went to the doctor and all blood work, chest x-ray and echocardiagram came back normal. Last week i suddenly had major lower back pain. That night I woke up 8 timest to urniate and realized it was my kidneys. I had a urinalysis and blood was found in my urine. i went on antibiotics and the kidney pain disappeared but now i still wake up about 3 times to urniate during the night. my doctors don't know what is wrong with me and don't seem too concerned. Any ideas??
 John Kenyon, CNA - Mon Mar 30, 2009 8:32 pm

User avatar Hello --

Some of the symptoms could correlate with a kidney infection. The elevated blood pressure, night sweats, and frequent urination for sure. The chest discomfort could also have been referred from a kidney as well. Lower back pain, in this case, was probably related as well, although that's less than common. The problem was diagnosed as a kidney infection and responded to antibiotics -- so far so good. But the continued nocturnal urgency and frequency doesn't add up. Your doctors don't seem concerned, which is encouraging, but it doesn't eliminate the annoyance of having to get up so often to answer the call.

This could be just a residual problem that will resolve with time. It also could be a sequal to the kidney infection, somehow having triggered interstitial cystitis or a related bladder problem. Have you been worked up by a urologist as yet? This would be an important step and I'm not clear on this from your post.

I'm still thinking about the potential relationship of all this to the tooth implantation, but so far no ideas other than random choice of infection from traveling in the blood. It's probably not important now, at least vs. solving the current problem.

I hope this is helpful to you. Good luck with this and please follow up with us as needed.

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