News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter   
 

 Headlines:

 
 

Doctors Lounge - Endocrinology Answers

"The information provided on www.doctorslounge.com is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between a patient/site visitor and his/her physician."

Back to Endocrinology Answers List

Forum Name: Endocrinology Topics

Question: High DHEAS and High Cortisol


 rina4doctors - Fri May 08, 2009 2:17 pm

I took a blood spot test and I have high DHEAS and cortisol.

My levels are:

DHEAS - 290 ug/dL normal range 40 - 290 ug/dL
Cortisol Morning - 15.1 ug/dL normal range 6 - 13 ug/dL

Here is some info about me. I am a 24 yr old female. I am 5'4" and weigh 125 lbs. I got my 1st period at 12 yrs old and have had regular periods since then. I have had hirsutism since childhood and developed acne after puberty. I have never taken oral contraceptives.

I suspect that I might have non classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia. If so what is the treatment for that. I heard that doctors prescribe glucocorticoid (prednisone, dexamethasone). However, I read that prolonged use of glucocorticoids can lead to Cushing's Syndrome.

Therefore I want to know if there are any alternate treatment for Non - classical CAH. Is there anyway to reduce my DHEAS without having any other complications.
 Dr.M.jagesh kamath - Sun Sep 05, 2010 10:29 am

User avatar Hello,NCAH IE Non Classical Congenital Hyperplasia occurs in 2% of patients presenting with hyper androgenic symptoms.In these patients a basal 17 hydroxy progesterone levels which show significant increase during the follicular phase.CYP21 genotyping is important for diagnosis and genetic counselling.Often the clinical picture of PCOS is indistinguishable from NCAH.Present guidelines recommend the use of basal serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels for the screening of NCAH among hyperandrogenic women .The Rotterdam ESHRE/ASRM-Sponsored PCOS Consensus Workshop Group 2004 Revised 2003 consensus on diagnostic criteria and long-term health risks related to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Hum Reprod 19:41–47[Abstract/Free Full Text].
You should get further investigated accordingly to get a firmer diagnosis before any specific treatment.
Best wishes.

|

Check a doctor's response to similar questions

 

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us

 
Copyright © 2001-2010
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME Articles

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

We subscribe to the HONcode principles of the HON Foundation. Click to verify.We subscribe to the HONcode principles.
Verify here