14 yr. old has high fever, vomiting, sun burn rash

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jjones
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14 yr. old has high fever, vomiting, sun burn rash

Postby jjones » Wed Sep 24, 2008 3:16 pm

My 14 yr. old son has been hospitalized 4 times since April 07, with the same symptoms. Vomiting, High Fever (104), Dehydration, Body aches and two days after all this he develops a sun burn rash that itches. We have had no luck with answers. I call it the $6,000.00 question mark. This weekend he was given 7 bags of fluids two different antibiotics, and steroids for the rash. All the test have come back as neg. it just shows a high white count. Back in April 07 we did a upper GI and it was fine. This time the doctors did a meningitis test and it was neg. it only showed one cell. His history is asthma, allergies (bee stings, nuts, seafood and seasonal allergies) and eczema. Do you have any suggestions?

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Judi Jones

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John Kenyon, CNA
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Re: 14 yr. old has high fever, vomiting, sun burn rash

Postby John Kenyon, CNA » Sat Oct 11, 2008 8:37 pm

Hello -

Since this has recurred several times since the spring, with a distinctive set of symptoms, plus the history of specific allergies, this could be difficult to pin down, but the first step would be to have your son tested for a variety of possible viral causes (Lyme disease, hepatitis, mono, etc.), to rule these out. At the same time, a careful process of elimination of potential allergens would need to be helpful, even though one rarely thinks of allergic reactions where fever is involved. It can happen, especially where there is a history of multiple protein allergies such as your son has exhibited.

While this isn't an answer to your puzzle, it is at least, hopefully, some help in what to seek in terms of diagnostic help. There are myriad potential viral causes that would need to be ruled out, not to mention a diary kept of activities and exposures to potential allergens or anything new or recently added to the diet.

I wish I could give you something more, but there are a good many more possibilities than meningitis which will need to be ruled out. Please let us know how things go, and if you think of any additonal information or possible causes, please let us know.
John Kenyon, EMT, CCT
Non-invasive cardiology tech, Emergency and Critical Care technician, Critical Incident Stress Mgmt. specialist

jjones
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Re: 14 yr. old has high fever, vomiting, sun burn rash

Postby jjones » Mon Oct 13, 2008 10:32 am

He has been tested for Lyme disease, hepatitis, mono everytime, and alway neg. they did give him atibotics for lyme diesease this time. But my gut tells me if it was lyme disease would we not find a tick on him at least once over the four times? Do you think it could be related to lupus or mastocystosis since they are in my family history?

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jjones

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John Kenyon, CNA
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Re: 14 yr. old has high fever, vomiting, sun burn rash

Postby John Kenyon, CNA » Mon Oct 13, 2008 7:38 pm

Hi again -

One would think a tick would show up at least once in all of this, but of course the fact is they often aren't found, which is one reason Lyme disease can be really infuriating to diagnose. Then again, lupus, when present, can account for some really bizarre and seemingly unrelated symptoms, so yes, if that were to come up positive, it would very likely be the answer to the mystery. Mastocytosis could possibly be responsible, but seems a lot less likely than the other two.

Please keep us updated. Thanks for your follow-up.
John Kenyon, EMT, CCT
Non-invasive cardiology tech, Emergency and Critical Care technician, Critical Incident Stress Mgmt. specialist


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