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Forum Name: Gastroenterology Topics

Question: malabsorption and mastocytosis


 luvumason - Fri Sep 12, 2008 1:48 pm

Hi, I have a four year old that was recently diagnosed with fat malabsorption and low levels of vitamin D. Since just three months of age he has suffered with diaherria which resulted in this testing just a few months ago. The gastro doctor has tested for so many things to try to find the culprit and everything so far has been negative. This resulted in her asking me if there is anything at all I can give her in terms of previous and past medical history. I told her just asthma and the diaherria. Well, she put him on creon 5 to see if that would help until we find the problem. Two days into taking the creon 5 he broke out into a rash that lasted for about a week and the doctor said it appeared to be a reaction and to take him off of the medication. After the rash went away he was left with a scaly bump on his back that made me think back. When he was 7 months he developed a bump simular to this one that he still has to this day. The dermatologist had done a biopsy and said that it was benign but, it was a mastocytoma and not to worry about it so, I never did. My question is...is a mastocytoma the same thing as mastocytosis and could this be a clue I should tell her about? Wouldn't his problems match a diagnosis of mastocytosis? Also, I should probably add that since the rash dissapeared he has been coughing a weezy and his primary care put him on albuterol and predisone for an asthma flare up.
 John Kenyon, CNA - Fri Mar 20, 2009 10:52 pm

User avatar Hello --

Mastocyosis is merely the presence of diffuse mastocytomas distributed in an area or different parts of the body. While one is a cytoma, the condition generalized is mastocytosis, and if there was one (now possibly two), then there may be others, and while often with mastocytosis these lesions are found in/on the skin, they also grow on mucosa, so frequently turn up in the digestive tract, where they can cause symptoms similar to sprue (malabsorption syndrome). This is well worth passing along to the GI doctor, as there's a good possibility this is what's causing the GI problems.

Asthma is probably not related, but everything should be looked at in light of possible mastocytosis.

I hope this is helpful. Please follow up with us here as needed and update us if you learn anything new.

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