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Forum Name: Gastroenterology Topics

Question: no appetite after partial gastric resection for esophageal c


 donnap6236 - Tue Sep 23, 2008 9:09 am

6weeks post op for partial gastrectomy for stage 1 esophageal cancer. surgery resulted in respiratory failure, trached and vent dependant for @3.5 weeks.
Currently in rehab, @50% of stomach removed. on appetite stimulants, remain unable to eat due to lack of appetite, food has no taste and everything smells bad. had peg tube placed 09-15-08, receiveing 30cc/hr enteral feedings with 1can containing 500 calories. currently attempting physical therapy but have no strength. what else beside remerin and an antidepressant can help? please, i have already lost more than 30lbs and lose weight almost daily!!
 John Kenyon, CNA - Tue Oct 14, 2008 10:31 pm

User avatar Hello -

At six weeks some patients would have recovered at least a partial appetite, but this really isn't as surprising as you may think. The enteral feeding is very important given the weight loss, but also can be contributing to the lack of appetite and interest. This poses a difficult dilemma, as you obviously have to have something going in, and while you've lost a lot of weight I hope some of that was immediately post-op. This should start to get better soon, especially with the appetite stimulants, but could be a reflex response to the surgery and then to the further intrusion of the feeding tube. There is also sometimes a temporary perversion of appetite and taste/smell senses after having been on a vent for a long time (and that was a long time).

Please stay in touch with us and let us know how things are going. I would hope and expect that things would start to improve before much longer, although significant improvement could be slow in arriving.

Best to you.

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