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Forum Name: Liver Diseases

Question: Pressure under right breast


 Shasta - Tue Dec 30, 2008 11:57 am

I recently had my gallbladder removed on 12/8/08 because I was having gallbladder attacks (4 within 7 months), pressure in the middle of chest in the pit of stomach admonial bloating and everything I was eating was giving me indigestion. The surgery was done larascopic and went fine. I still get some nausea when eating certain foods and am taking an aciphex daily which seems to help. I now have a constant pressure under the right breast. It seems to be more intense after I eat. It is not a pain, but very uncomfortable constant pressure. I have not been able to wear a bra, because it causes more discomfort. Before I had my gallbladder out this area was not an issue. What could it be? I did have a hida scan and ultrasound before my gallbladder surgery and the hida scan came back borderline and the ultrasound of my gallbladder, liver and stomach was fine. I also had a endoscopy to have my stomach checked out for acid reflux, ulcers and that also came back fine. Now that my gallbladder is gone, I assumed all my symptoms were associated with that, but I'm still having pressure now under the right breast. Any suggestions of what it could be?
 John Kenyon, CNA - Sun Jan 04, 2009 9:42 pm

User avatar Hello -

This will need to be evaluated either by the surgeon who performed the cholecystectomy, or by a GI specialist. While it's probably directly related to the surgery, it's been almost a month now, and there could be something that needs attention: often a stray stone or, though it's an awfully long time for this, you still could have some of the gas/air (whatever was used to inflate your abdomen for the procedure) trapped somewhere that's been unable to escape osmotically as is usual.

So long as you have no associated symptoms (other than the ones you've mentioned, which aren't at all unusual following removal of the gallbladder), this is probably something relatively minor and anatomical in nature, but it should be checked anyway.

Wish I could give you a more definite answer, but there are any number of possible causes for this, almost all of which are fairly to completely benign, but there's no sense leaving anything to chance.

Hope this is helpful. Best of luck to you. Please follow up with us here as needed.

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