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Forum Name: Liver Diseases

Question: Isolated high GGT, retested


 vettechick - Wed Oct 21, 2009 12:13 pm

I have a bit of a complicated question. Here it goes:

I initially had a paramed exam done to qualify for medical insurance. They called me two days prior to the exam and instructed me to fast 8 hours prior to the exam. However, the days prior to the exam I had had at most 1 beer - so lets say 4 beers that week. The results revealed that I had a high GGT (147) score. They denied me for insurance. They used a range of 0-45.

I received the results about a week later and I had just returned from a business trip, I had two glasses of wine. After reading up on GGT I have learned that alcohol, even consumed earlier in the week can severely affect the test, as it is very sensitive. So I waited approximately 5 days before I had a second blood test to evaluate my GGT. The results revealed that once again my GGT was high (67) in a range of 0-60.

All of my other tests are normal, including my ALT, AST and Bili. Tot. None of the results are in the high range.

I am pretty certain that this is just a fluke, as I don't have a history of alcoholism or even severe drinking. Additionally, my GGT results are severely different.

I'm 24 years old, female and within the normal weight range. I have never had a problem with my liver and don't have any symptoms of liver disease.

How long should I wait to retest? What other factors could be affecting my results?
 Dr.M.Aroon kamath - Tue Nov 03, 2009 7:48 am

User avatar Hi vettechick,
An isolated elevation of the GGTP level does not need to be further evaluated unless, there are additional clinical risk factors for liver disease.

An isolated high value for GGTP is not usuallly considered in any way as the hallmark of chronic alcoholism.

If it is accompanied by a raised MCV (mean corpuscular volume) and BAL (blood alcohol levels), then it assumes significance.

In social drinkers, blood alcohol levels may return to normal in the short term if they abstained, but in chronic alcoholics, even if they abstained,GGTP and MCV may take much longer to return to normal levels.
Good luck!

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