News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter   
 

 Headlines:

 
 

Doctors Lounge - Gynecology Answers

"The information provided on www.doctorslounge.com is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between a patient/site visitor and his/her physician."

Back to Gynecology Answers List

Forum Name: Gynecology

Question: Lump, turned open sore on vaginal opening


 symon - Fri Feb 03, 2006 4:11 am

I am a 20 year old female. I recently developed a penny sized lump on the lower, left side of my vaginal opening. The lump developed while I had a cold (mostly head congestion and sore throat, no fever or achiness). The lump was hard, tender, and kind of itchy, and I squeezed it because I thought it might pop (even though it didn't have a head). It didn't, but after 2 days it developed into an open sore that had a greyish-white appearance. The sore hurt quite a bit, but healed in about 5 days. I immediately thought it might be some kind of STD, maybe herpes, but I have not been sexually active in over a year and have never had any other symptoms of an STD other than a couple yeast infections, and I didn't think that a lump was characteristic of herpes. What could it be? Thanks for any insight!
 Dr. Tamer Fouad - Fri Feb 03, 2006 5:25 am

User avatar Hello,

Cystic vaginal lumps include: vaginal mucous cyst, cyst of the canal of Nuck, Bartholin's cyst, Skene's duct cyst, epidermal inclusion cyst, furunculosis.

Bartholin's gland are located posterolateral part on either side of the labia minora (at 4 and 8 o'clock positions). The glands are normally about the size of a pea and are not normally palpable. They drain into a duct approximately 2.5 cm long which opens just outside hymenal ring into a fold between the hymen and the labium.

The gland's secretions provide moisture for the vulva but are not essential for sexual lubrication; and removal of the gland does not seem to decrease vaginal moisture or sexual function.

Bartholin gland cysts develop from cystic dilation of the duct following blockage of the duct orifice. They are generally 1 to 3 cm in size and are usually asymptomatic.

When symptoms occur, the patient may report vulvar pain, dyspareunia, inability to engage in sports and pain during walking or sitting. Bartholin gland cysts tend to grow slowly. Since noninfected cysts are usually sterile, routine antibiotic therapy is not necessary.

When they do become infected they can lead to abscess formation.

Treatment includes antibiotics when infection is suspected, or surgical management. Simple lancing of a Bartholin gland cyst or abscess may result in recurrence. More effective treatment methods include use of a Word catheter and marsupialization, both of which can be performed in the office.

Please seek an appointment with your gynecologist.

Best regards.
 symon - Fri Feb 03, 2006 2:07 pm

Is it possible that these cysts can just heal themselves? Once the sore was healed the lump was gone.
 Dr. Tamer Fouad - Mon Feb 06, 2006 1:37 am

User avatar They may heal spontaneously, however, they mostly recurr and are usually troublesome.

Best regards.
 symon - Mon Feb 06, 2006 3:07 am

I've made an appointment to see my doctor. Thank you so much for your help!!
 AahNoD: - Wed Dec 09, 2009 7:16 pm

Hey Im 15 And I Kind Of Have The Same Problem.You Can't Really See The Lump And Is On The Right Lip Of The Vagina But You Can Feel It And Is A Tad Bit Sore. What Could This Be And Is It Harmful??

|

Check a doctor's response to similar questions

 

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us

 
Copyright © 2001-2010
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME Articles

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

We subscribe to the HONcode principles of the HON Foundation. Click to verify.We subscribe to the HONcode principles.
Verify here