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Forum Name: Gynecology

Question: Leaving PCOS Untreated


 SohoBelle - Sat Aug 14, 2010 5:33 am

I am 22 and a virgin. I recently underwent an ultrasound and I was diagnosed with PCOS by my GP. I have almost all the symptoms except irregular menstruation. My GP referred my to a gynecologist in order to discuss my treatment in more detail. When I went to the gynecologist, she asked me if I was having my periods regularly, and I said that I was. She said then I have nothing to worry about and that I can tackle my weight problems with some dieting and exercise and being hirsute is not a big issue. She said she wasn't prescribing medicines to me as she didn't want to disrupt the balance in my body. She also said that the symptoms of PCOS would go away once I got "married" - I don't know if she meant once I become sexually active or once I conceive. Anyway, that was all that the gynecologist advised and I left her room feeling unsatisfied. I researched this over the internet and found that one can have periods with ovulating, and ovulation is hindered by PCOS, so it could be that I am menstruating monthly without actually ovulating. There are some long term effects of untreated PCOS like infertility, diabetes, etc. My question is, should I pursue treatment from another doctor, or was the gynecologist right to say that I have no reason to worry at the moment? Pursuing treatment again would be tricky since my health insurance company will check that I am seeking treatment for the same issue again and may not cover the cost. So I will only go back if I really have to. Please tell me what I should do.
 Debbie Miller, RN - Wed Aug 18, 2010 1:16 am

User avatar Hello,
I cannot address your insurance issues but in most cases second opinions are covered. It is not usually expected that you have to accept only one doctor's suggestion or diagnosis.

If the hirsutism is bothering you and you have PCOS, getting treatment can help you with that as well as making it easier to lose weight with the recommended diet and exercise. I do not know why your doctor is opposed to this treatment and it has nothing to do with being married or sexually active as I see it, unless you were trying to conceive. I would seek another opinion, perhaps with an endocrinologist.

Being treated for PCOS can help you psychologically and physically since this is a metabolic and multiple hormone issue which can involve insulin resistance and can lead to diabetes. These are important concerns apart from period and pregnancy problems.

Best wishes.

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