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Forum Name: Hematology Topics

Question: Differing and Confusing Blood Results


 KellyH - Tue Jan 31, 2006 9:58 pm

Hi,
I am a 20 year old college student. In the past year I have lost roughly ten lbs (I am 5'7 120lbs). I experience extreme fatigue to the point that I don't feel like standing up. Im constantly thirsty and I easily get motion sickness. I also frequently get dizzy when standing up. No matter how much I sleep, its not enough. I never feel rested. I have tested negative for anemia. I had labs done and they gave me a blood sugar of 127 and a SED rate of 80. They were re-done and my blood sugar and SED rate were normal but my CRP was 15.6. The third set of tests show all levels are normal. Ive had an ANA for lupus and that came back negative. My thyroid was also tested (by a family doctor) and that was normal. I am not depressed, which has been suggested. I also have a tiny hard lymph node on the side of my neck, its moveable and can feel semi irritated if I move it around. Everyone in my family is extremely healthy and the only medication I take is birth control.Any ideas? Im tired of being tired.
 Dr. Tamer Fouad - Thu Feb 02, 2006 4:54 pm

User avatar Hello,

Fatigue is a difficult complaint to assess. I am glad that your blood counts turned out well. You have also excluded lupus. Did you test for thyroid dysfunction? Typically the hypothyroid patient wakes up in the morning feeling well and later develops fatigue on physical activity. On the other hand, patients that report waking up feeling fatigued may be depressed.

Fatigue can accompany another set of conditions, which include, infection (bacterial endocarditis, parasitic infections, AIDS, tuberculosis, and mononucleosis) as well as congestive heart failure, diabetes, chronic liver or kidney disease, Addison's disease, anorexia or other eating disorders, arthritis, autoimmune diseases, malnutrition and cancer. Certain medications may lead to fatigue such as cancer chemotherapy.

Various sleep disorders such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, or narcolepsy can cause fatigue. Other conditions include pain, hay fever or asthma and regular use of alcohol or illegal drugs like cocaine.

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a condition that may present with flu-like symptoms and last for more than 6 months. This is a diagnosis of exclusion. CFS is not easily relieved including by rest.

Based on his assessment, your doctor would choose which investigations to perform next. This may include referral to a psychiatrist.

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