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Forum Name: Hematology Topics

Question: REd Blood Count Question


 countrygirl - Mon Jul 30, 2007 12:20 pm

I had a full blood count done today because I have a gynaecology problem which has resulted in my having bleeding for 5 weeks varying from slight to heavy on average heavy every three days. I am 46 yrs old and see a gynaecologist in two weeks.

In the past I have always been told that I have very good full blood count results with my red count being between 14 and 15. I was told normal is between 12 and 16 ( UK). As I had been bleeding for 5 weeks I was assuming I must be getting anaemic but have just had a message from my Dr's surgery to say that my result was very good at 15.3.

I don't understand how you can bleed for 25 days and not get anaemic. My husband has suggested that I maybe am very very good at converting iron in food for my bodies use but could there be a sinister reason for my red blood count being very good at this time??

I have never had an abnormal full blood count.

I do tend to bleed alot after a blood test and have to press hard for at least 5 mins but my ESR was tests three weeks ago and was normal.

I am worried that I have an underlying blood disorder that is only been kept in check because I am female and bleeding????
 Debbie Miller, RN - Mon Jul 30, 2007 4:13 pm

User avatar Even though it seems like a lot of blood is lost, the total amount is probably not that much. In a normal period a woman loses between 50 and 250 ml (1/4 and 1 cup) total blood. Considering we can donate blood every couple of months and safely give approximately 500 ml (1 pint) without consequence, it makes sense that it would take a prolonged bleeding to put you into any kind of risk. Yes, you do continue to convert and make more iron for your blood. This is the reason we can regularly donate.

Be sure you do not get dehydrated because your body does need fluid to make blood. And of course you want to continue to be evaluated if this continues. It is not unusual in the perimenopausal period for periods to be irregular like this.
 countrygirl - Mon Jul 30, 2007 5:02 pm

Thank you for talking some sense into me! I hadn't thought about being able to donate a pint of blood every couple of months and still not get aneamic.
Because this bleeding has gone on so long and on the heavy days it seems alot as you say overall its not like donating blood.

Two weeks to go before I see the gynaecologist and hopefully get the necessary tests done to rule out anything other than I'm at that awful age!

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