Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Nursing | Surgery | Dentistry | News

Back to Health News

After Teeth Are Pulled, Platelet-Rich Plasma May Speed Healing

Last Updated: April 23, 2010.

 

Process speeds formation of jaw bone, researchers say

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Process speeds formation of jaw bone, researchers say.

FRIDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- Platelet-rich plasma accelerates healing and bone formation after tooth extraction, a new study shows.

Poor healing after tooth removal can result in excessive jaw bone loss that may delay the use of dental prosthetics or implants, require expensive reconstructive surgery, or be impossible to repair, according to the researchers.

The study included patients who had surgery to remove wisdom teeth. One extraction site was treated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) while the site on the other side of the mouth was used as a control. During 24 weeks of follow-up, the patients were checked for jaw bone density, healing, bleeding, inflammation, pain and facial swelling.

"The PRP treatment has a positive effect on bone density immediately following tooth extraction," while the control sites showed a decrease in bone density in the first week after surgery, the researchers said.

"It took approximately six weeks for the control sites to reach the same bone density that the PRP-treated site had reached by week one," they wrote. "The immediate start of bone formation seen with PRP treatment is of clinical relevance because it is the initial two weeks following bone manipulation oral surgery that are important."

PRP had little effect on bleeding, inflammation, pain and facial swelling.

Using PRP to promote faster jaw bone formation may reduce the waiting time for dental prosthetics or implants to two to four months instead of the current four to six months, according to the researchers.

The study was recently published in the Journal of Oral Implantology.

More information

The American Association of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgeons has more about wisdom teeth.

SOURCE: Journal of Oral Implantology, news release, April 19, 2010

Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Allergy-Linked Mouth Breathing Spells Trouble for Kids Next: Cat Allergy Doesn't Have to Mean Giving Up Kitty

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.