Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Research | AIDS | News

Back to Health News

U.S. Hispanics Have 1 in 52 Estimated Lifetime Risk of HIV

Last Updated: October 14, 2010.

 

Rate is lower than among black Americans, but higher than among whites, research shows

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Rate is lower than among black Americans, but higher than among whites, research shows.

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- One in 36 Hispanic men and one in 106 Hispanic women in the United States are at risk of being diagnosed with HIV in their lifetime. The overall estimated lifetime risk of HIV diagnosis among Hispanics is one in 52, according to a federal government study released Thursday.

HIV is the virus that causes AIDS.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers analyzed 2007 data from 37 states and Puerto Rico and found that Hispanics had a lower overall estimated lifetime risk (ELR) of an HIV diagnosis than blacks (one in 22), but had a nearly three times higher rate than whites (one in 170).

The study also found that the estimated lifetime risk of HIV diagnosis for Hispanic males was three times higher than for white males (one in 102), while the rate for Hispanic females was five times higher than for white females (one in 538).

The researchers suggested a number of ways to lower the risk of HIV diagnosis among Hispanics. These include an increased focus on culturally and linguistically appropriate intervention programs and increased access to HIV testing, prevention, care and treatment.

The study findings appear in the Oct. 15 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, published by the CDC.

More information

The CDC has more about HIV/AIDS and Hispanics.

SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, Oct. 14, 2010

Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Most Doctors Don't Follow Colon Cancer Screening Guidelines Next: Genes May Help Explain High Blood Pressure in Blacks

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.