Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Dermatology | Nursing | Pediatrics | Allergy | Nutrition | Preventive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

Preparation Can Help Kids With Nut Allergies Travel Safely

Last Updated: November 24, 2010.

 

Pack snacks, meds and sanitizing wipes to reduce likelihood of a reaction, expert suggests

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Pack snacks, meds and sanitizing wipes to reduce likelihood of a reaction, expert suggests.

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of children with nut allergies need to take special precautions if they're traveling during the holiday season, an expert warns.

"The best thing to do is plan ahead. Though you can't plan for everything, being prepared will help keep your child safe and limit your holiday stress," Dr. Sean Cahill, an associate professor of pediatrics at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, said in a Loyola news release.

One of the most important things is to keep your child's hands -- and surfaces that your child touches -- as clean as possible, he said. An allergic reaction can occur when children touch a surface that's been exposed to nuts and then places their hand(s) in their mouth.

Cahill offered the following general travel tips:

  • Packing snacks will ensure you have safe food for your child.
  • Make sure you know how restaurant food is prepared. For example, some fast-food restaurants cook their food in peanut oil.
  • In case of an emergency, have an EpiPen and antihistamine medications with you at all times.

Cahill also noted that peanuts are a common airline snack and aircraft seats often contain traces of nuts. He advised parents to use sanitizing wipes to clean all solid surfaces, including arm rests and tray tables.

Dress children in a long-sleeved shirt and long pants, to limit the amount of nut residue that comes into contact with their skin.

And remember to bring a note from your doctor so that your EpiPen doesn't cause you trouble with airport security, he added.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has more about food allergy.

SOURCE: Loyola University Health System, news release, Nov. 22, 2010

Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Black Smokers May Face Higher Death Risk Than Whites: CDC Next: Too Many Cancers Still Spotted Too Late: CDC

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.