Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Cardiology | Dermatology | Family Medicine | Diabetes | Immunology | Nutrition | News

Back to Health News

Psoriasis Linked to Raised Heart Risks

Last Updated: December 20, 2010.

 

40% of study patients with skin disorder had factors such as diabetes, obesity

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
40% of study patients with skin disorder had factors such as diabetes, obesity.

MONDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- People with psoriasis are at increased risk for a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors known as metabolic syndrome, a new study has found.

The features that make up metabolic syndrome include obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes and high total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, according to background information in the study. Psoriasis is a common skin problem caused by a problem with the immune system.

In the study, researchers analyzed data from 6,549 people, average age 39, in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and found that 40 percent of people with psoriasis had features of metabolic syndrome, compared with 23 percent of people without psoriasis.

The most common features of metabolic syndrome among people with psoriasis were: abdominal obesity (63 percent); high triglyceride levels (44 percent); and low levels of "good" high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (34 percent).

Only 13 percent of people with psoriasis had no features of metabolic syndrome, compared with 28 percent of those without psoriasis, the investigators found.

"In conclusion, these findings from a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults show a doubling in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among patients with psoriasis independent of age, sex, race/ethnicity and C-reactive protein levels," wrote Dr. Thorvardur Jon Love, of Landspitali University Hospital in Iceland, and colleagues.

"Given its associated serious complications, this comorbidity needs to be recognized and taken into account when treating individuals with psoriasis," they concluded.

The findings are published in the Dec. 20 online edition and will appear in the April 2011 print issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about psoriasis.

SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Dec. 20, 2010

Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Brain Imaging May Predict Dyslexia Gains Next: Liver Cancer Survival Rates May Be Worse for Blacks

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.