Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Infections | Nursing | Medical Students | News

Back to Health News

Nose May Be Best Place to Screen for MRSA Infection

Last Updated: January 07, 2011.

 

High levels of the bacteria there means other body sites are likely colonized, study finds

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
High levels of the bacteria there means other body sites are likely colonized, study finds.

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A new study finds that people with high levels of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria in the nose are more likely to have other areas of the body colonized by MRSA, which can cause potentially fatal infections.

Researchers at Rhode Island Hospital wanted to assess the quantity of MRSA at different locations on the body and the relationship between the quantities of MRSA at different locations.

The investigators found that MRSA was more likely to be found in the nose than under the arms, the groin, or the perineum (skin between the rectum and genitals). They also found that people with high levels of MRSA in the nose were more likely to have MRSA in the other three locations.

"This study shows us that the quantities of MRSA at different body sites are highly correlated. Also, if screening cultures are to be done for MRSA, it is best to screen the nose and groin to get the highest yield," lead author Dr. Leonard Mermel, medical director of the epidemiology and infection control department, said in a hospital news release.

The study was released online Jan. 5 in advance of publication in an upcoming print issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.

"We hope that future studies will assess whether or not a greater number of body sites colonized with MRSA or a greater quantity of MRSA at those body sites impacts the likelihood of future MRSA infections," Mermel said.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about MRSA infections.

SOURCE: Rhode Island Hospital, news release, Jan. 5, 2011

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Breast Cancer Outcome: Your Doctor Matters Next: Health Highlights: Jan. 7, 2011

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.