Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Pediatrics | Obstetrics | AIDS | News

Back to Health News

HIV Linked to Higher Pregnancy Rate in Young Women

Last Updated: February 01, 2011.

 

Study also finds more complications among those with the infection

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Study also finds more complications among those with the infection.

TUESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-positive teens and young women are more likely to get pregnant and to have pregnancy complications than are those who do not have HIV, a new study finds.

Researchers from Johns Hopkins analyzed the records of 181 HIV-positive female patients, aged 13 to 24, who had been treated at four hospitals over 12 years. More than a third of them became pregnant, some more than once, for a total of 96 pregnancies.

The rate of premature births among the HIV-infected mothers was 34 percent, compared with 22 percent for mothers in the general population, the study reported in the Feb. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Those with HIV who became pregnant also had a higher rate of miscarriage than pregnant women in the general population -- 14 percent vs. 9 percent.

Pregnancies occurred in 28 of the 130 females who were infected with HIV at birth and in 38 of the 51 who became HIV-positive through high-risk behavior such as unsafe sex or injection drug use. The pregnancy rate of those infected through high-risk behavior was seven times higher than that of those who were infected with HIV at birth, the study found.

Those who'd acquired HIV through high-risk behavior also had more repeated pregnancies than did those who were infected at birth -- 37 percent vs. 14 percent. Females infected at birth were four times more likely to terminate a pregnancy than were those with behaviorally acquired HIV -- 41 percent vs. 10 percent.

The findings raise a number of concerns, the researchers said. They show that HIV-infected teens and young adults continue to have unsafe sex and that pregnancies place these already vulnerable young women and their fetuses in serious danger for complications.

The findings also "suggest that teens who were infected with HIV later in life may engage in different sexual behaviors than those infected at birth," Dr. Kelly Gebo, an infectious disease specialist and the study's senior investigator, said in a Hopkins news release.

"Further analysis into these differences will help us find ways to prevent unwanted pregnancies and avoid complications from planned ones," Gebo said.

More information

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has more about HIV and pregnancy.

SOURCE: Johns Hopkins Children's Center, news release, Feb. 1, 2011

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: New Campaign Urges Women to Know Signs of Heart Attack Next: Look-and-Sound-Alike Names Account for Many Painkiller Prescription Errors

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.