Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Neurology | ENT | News

Back to Health News

Musicians Maintain Memory, Hearing as They Age

Last Updated: May 12, 2011.

 

'Sound' training may help them hear speech in noisy settings, improve recall, research suggests

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
'Sound' training may help them hear speech in noisy settings, improve recall, research suggests.

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Music hath charms to protect the aging brain.

That's the finding of a study by Northwestern University researchers who compared adults aged 45 to 65 with and without musical experience.

"Lifelong musical training appears to confer advantages in at least two important functions known to decline with age -- memory and the ability to hear speech in noise," study co-author Nina Kraus, director of the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University's School of Communication, said in a university news release.

She and her colleagues found that the 18 musicians in the study performed much better on tests of auditory memory and the ability to hear speech in noisy settings compared to the 19 non-musicians.

The study findings were published in the May 11 online edition of the journal PLoS One.

"Difficulty hearing speech in noise is among the most common complaints of older adults, but age-related hearing loss only partially accounts for this impediment that can lead to social isolation and depression," Kraus noted. "It's well known that adults with virtually the same hearing profile can differ dramatically in their ability to hear speech in noise."

Music training "fine-tunes" the nervous system, she explained.

"Sound is the stock in trade of the musician in much the same way that a painter of portraits is keenly attuned to the visual attributes of the paint that will convey his or her subject," Kraus added.

"If the materials that you work with are sound, then it is reasonable to suppose that all of your faculties involved with taking it in, holding it in memory and relating physically to it should be sharpened," she added. "Music experience bolsters the elements that combat age-related communication problems."

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders has more about hearing loss and older adults.

SOURCE: Northwestern University, news release, May 11, 2011

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Lactose Intolerance May Sometimes Be in the Head, Not the Gut Next: Health Highlights: May 12, 2011

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.