Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Dermatology | Nursing | Psychiatry | Preventive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

Psychotherapists With Tidy Offices Seen as More Competent

Last Updated: June 10, 2011.

 

Decor seems to influence people's perception of quality of care, study finds

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Decor seems to influence people's perception of quality of care, study finds.

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- People seem to base their opinion of a psychotherapist's abilities on the appearance of their office, research suggests.

The study included 242 college students who were shown photographs of offices belonging to actual psychotherapists in Manhattan. After viewing the photos, the participants gave higher marks for quality and qualifications to psychotherapists whose offices were neat and orderly, featured personal elements such as framed photos and diplomas, and were decorated with soft items such as pillows and throw rugs.

There were no differences in results between people who had seen a therapist and those who hadn't, men and women, people of different ages, or people from small towns or large cities. This suggests that the findings apply across the general population, the Ohio State University researchers said.

"People seem to agree on what the office of a good therapist would look like and, especially, what it wouldn't look like," study co-author Jack Nasar, a professor of city and regional planning, said in a university news release.

"Whether it is through cultural learning or something else, people think they can judge therapists just based on their office environment," he added.

"The top-rated offices also pointed to the importance of softness and order," Nasar said. "For the top five offices, participants most frequently described the office as comfortable, nice, clean, warm and inviting." The words used to describe the offices at the bottom of the rating scale were "cluttered," "cramped," "messy," "uncomfortable" and "unprofessional," he noted.

"These results suggest that someone visiting a therapist in a low-rated office for the first time may not want to come back," he explained. "I would tell therapists to keep their offices soft and friendly looking. Put up your diplomas and personalize the office. Arrange everything in a neat and orderly way and keep it that way."

The study was released online in advance of publication in an upcoming print issue of the Journal of Counseling Psychology.

More information

McGill University has more about psychotherapy.

SOURCE: Ohio State University, news release, June 7, 2011

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: New Device Performs Body Scans Simultaneously Next: Distracted Driving May Be Rising Despite State Laws

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.