Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Dermatology | Geriatrics | Nutrition | Preventive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

Compound in Berries May Lessen Sun Damage

Last Updated: April 21, 2009.

 

Study in mice finds ellagic acid, also in nuts, limits wrinkling

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Study in mice finds ellagic acid, also in nuts, limits wrinkling.

TUESDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- You probably already knew that berries are nutritious. But new research shows that a compound found in berries, nuts and other fruits might help prevent wrinkles and repair skin damage caused by the sun.

Researchers in Korea applied ellagic acid, an antioxidant found in raspberries, strawberries, cranberries and pomegranates, to human skin cells in the lab and to the skin of hairless mice that had been exposed to strong, ultraviolet rays.

In the human cells, ellagic acid reduced the destruction of collagen and inflammatory response, both major causes of wrinkles.

Researchers had a similar result in 4-week-old mice, which are often used in dermatology studies because their skin is similar to that of humans.

For eight weeks, 12 hairless mice were exposed three times a week to increasing ultraviolet radiation. The exposure would have been strong enough to cause sunburn and skin damage in humans, according to the researchers, from Hallym University in South Korea.

Half of the exposed mice were given daily topical applications of ellagic acid, even on the days in which they did not receive UV exposure. Ellagic acid was not applied to the other mice.

The mice that did not receive ellagic acid developed wrinkles and thickening of the skin that indicates sun damage.

The mice that received the ellagic acid showed less wrinkle formation, according to the study, which was expected to be presented Tuesday at the Experimental Biology 2009 meeting in New Orleans.

In human skin cells, ellagic acid protects against ultraviolet damage by blocking production of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes that break down collagen and reduce the expression of ICAM, a molecule involved with inflammation.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on preventing sun damage.

SOURCES: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology news release, April 21, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas Next: Wine May Guard Against Lymphoma Recurrence

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.