Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Cardiology | Family Medicine | Hepatology | Nutrition | News

Back to Health News

Fatty Liver Disease Doesn’t Affect Survival, Study Finds

Last Updated: November 28, 2011.

 

Researchers surprised that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease had no impact on health, longevity

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Researchers surprised that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease had no impact on health, longevity.

MONDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) does not increase the risk of death, according to a new study finding that surprised Johns Hopkins researchers.

It's long been thought that NAFLD -- a condition associated with obesity and heart disease -- had a detrimental impact on health and longevity. But the new study concluded that NAFLD does not affect survival.

"Physicians have considered fatty liver disease a really worrisome risk factor for cardiovascular disease," study leader Dr. Mariana Lazo, a postdoctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, said in a Hopkins news release.

"Our data analysis shows this doesn't appear to be the case. We were surprised to say the least because we expected to learn by how much non-alcoholic fatty liver disease increased the risk of death and instead found the answer was not at all," Lazo explained.

The researchers analyzed data from more than 11,000 Americans, aged 20 to 74, who were followed for up to 18 years as part of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

No evidence of increased risk of death was found among the 20 percent of participants with NAFLD, according to the study published Nov. 18 in BMJ.

According to the American Liver Foundation, NAFLD affects up to 25 percent of Americans. The condition is characterized by the liver's inability to break down fats, along with fat accumulation in the liver.

"We don't yet know why mortality is not affected or whether there might be some actual protective effect of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, but it looks like the liver's ability to accumulate fat may somehow shield the body from the detrimental effects of other health problems such as obesity and diabetes," Lazo said in the news release.

More information

The American Liver Foundation has more about non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

SOURCE: Johns Hopkins Medicine, news release, Nov. 21, 2011

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Brain Pathways Seem Disrupted in Kids With ADHD Next: Doctors in a Bind When Parents Want to Delay, Skip Vaccines

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.