Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Gastroenterology | Allergy | Nutrition | Preventive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

Some ‘Gluten-Free’ Beers Really Aren’t: Study

Last Updated: December 28, 2011.

 

Other 'low-gluten' beers contain high amounts of the celiac disease irritant

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Other 'low-gluten' beers contain high amounts of the celiac disease irritant.

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Regular beer and even some brands of beer labeled "low-gluten" contain high levels of gluten and could cause problems for people with celiac disease, a new study says.

Beer is made using barely, which contains a form of gluten called hordein. However, some beer companies contend that the brewing process eliminates gluten or reduces it to very low levels, according to a release from the Journal of Proteome Research, where the new study appears.

Because existing tests for detecting gluten in malted products are not very accurate, the research team developed a new test that's highly accurate for hordein.

They used this test to analyze 60 commercial beers and found that many of the regular brands contained significant levels of hordein.

Eight brands labeled "gluten-free" did not contain hordein. However, the researchers were surprised to discover that two of the brands labeled "gluten-free" actually had about as much hordein as regular beer.

People with celiac disease need to avoid gluten, a protein that triggers a reaction that damages the small intestine. Diarrhea, constipation, fatigue and abdominal pain are among the symptoms experienced by people with celiac disease when they consume foods and beverages with gluten.

The only treatment for people with celiac disease is to remain on a lifelong gluten-free diet.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about celiac disease.

SOURCE: Journal of Proteome Research, news release, Dec. 21, 2011

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Columbus Voyage Tied to Syphilis Spread? Next: Know the Signs of Alzheimer's

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.