Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Endocrinology | Pediatrics | News

Back to Health News

Monkeys Treated With ‘Love Hormone’  Show More Kindness

Last Updated: January 10, 2012.

 

Two monkeys were more likely to share juice after inhaling oxytocin in study

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Two monkeys were more likely to share juice after inhaling oxytocin in study.

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The so-called "love hormone" oxytocin promotes greater kindness in monkeys, a new study finds.

It included two rhesus macaques who were seated next to each other and trained to choose different symbols that either provided a squirt of fruit juice for the monkey itself, juice for the other monkey or no juice at all.

In repeated tests, the monkeys had to make a choice between just two of the options: juice for self or no juice; juice to self or juice to other; and juice to other or no juice.

After inhaling oxytocin, the monkeys paid more attention to each other and were more likely to give the other monkey juice, even if they didn't get juice themselves, the Duke University researchers found.

Oxytocin is currently being evaluated as a therapy for autism, schizophrenia and other disorders characterized by a lack of interest or caring about others, study leader Michael Platt, a neuroscientist and director of the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, noted in a Duke news release.

The hormone appears to boost trust and social skills in patients, but it's not known how the process works or whether the effects are consistent over the long term.

This type of research may help establish monkeys as a good behavioral and pharmacological model for understanding oxytocin therapy, Platt said.

However, scientists note that research involving animals often fails to produce similar results in humans.

More information

The American Psychological Association has more about oxytocin.

SOURCE: Duke University, news release, Jan. 5, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Dementia May Lead to Avoidable Hospitalizations Next: Asian-Americans More Apt to Die in Hospital After Heart Attacks

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.