Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Gynecology | Obstetrics | Psychiatry | Nutrition | News

Back to Health News

Weight Gain Often Unrecognized by Young Women

Last Updated: January 13, 2012.

 

Those on birth control shots and young black women more alert to added pounds, study finds

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Those on birth control shots and young black women more alert to added pounds, study finds.

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Many young American women fail to recognize recent weight gain, and self-perception of weight gain appears to be significantly influenced by race, ethnicity and birth control methods, according to a new study.

The findings are important because weight gain increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and other obesity-related health problems, said the researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston.

They surveyed 466 women, average age 25, about their weight and other health measures every six months for three years. Nearly one-third of the women did not recognize weight gains of 4.5 pounds during a six-month period, and nearly one-quarter did not recognize weight gains of 8.8 pounds.

Those most likely to recognize weight gain were black women and those who used the birth control injection depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, or DMPA.

The study appears online and in the March print issue of the Journal of Women's Health.

"We were surprised to find that race and ethnicity are determinants of accurate recognition of weight gain, predictors that have never before been reported," lead author Mahbubur Rahman, an assistant professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology, said in a university news release.

Further research is needed to explore the link between race, ethnicity and self-perception of weight, he added.

Rahman said the finding that women who use DMPA are more likely to recognize weight gain may be due to the fact that this form of birth control has been widely reported to be associated with weight gain. This may make users of DMPA more likely to monitor their weight.

"In prior studies, we've reported that one-quarter of reproductive-age women who are overweight or obese consider themselves to be normal weight. Misperception of actual weight coupled with inaccuracies in self-perception of weight gain is a threat to the success of obesity-prevention programs," Rahman said. "Changing a health behavior depends on patients understanding susceptibility to a health problem."

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers advice about preventing weight gain.

SOURCE: University of Texas Medical Branch, news release, Jan. 10, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Normal Pregnancies May Be Misdiagnosed as Ectopic Next: Recent Rotavirus Vaccines Safe, Study Says

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.