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Certain Cancer Drugs May Have Fatal Side Effects: Analysis

Last Updated: February 06, 2012.

 

Risk is very small, but doctors, patients should be made aware, investigators say

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Risk is very small, but doctors, patients should be made aware, investigators say.

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with three relatively new cancer drugs may be linked to a slightly increased risk of death, a new analysis suggests.

While the risk is low, it should be taken into account by doctors and patients, according to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists and colleagues.

The investigators analyzed the findings of 10 clinical trials that included nearly 4,700 patients treated with sorafenib (Nexavar) for kidney and liver cancer; sunitinib (Sutent) for kidney cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumor; or pazopanib (Votrient) for kidney cancer.

These so-called "targeted" drugs are used to stop the growth or spread of cancer by blocking the vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors in cancer cells, the researchers explained in a Dana-Farber news release.

The analysis of the clinical trials revealed that the incidence of fatal complications was 1.5 percent in patients who received any of the three drugs, compared with 0.7 percent in patients who received standard treatments or placebos.

Bleeding, heart attack and heart failure were the most common fatal side effects noted in the clinical trials. In addition, liver failure was also reported, according to the report published in the Feb. 6 edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

"There is no doubt for the average patient, these drugs have benefits and are [U.S. Food and Drug Administration]-approved for these indications," study leader Dr. Toni Choueiri said in the news release. "While the absolute incidence of these fatal side effects is very small, the relative risks are higher and patients and practitioners need to be aware of it."

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about targeted cancer therapies.

SOURCE: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, news release, Feb. 6, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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