Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Pediatrics | Asthma | News

Back to Health News

Late Preemie Birth May Be Linked to Higher Asthma Risk

Last Updated: March 05, 2012.

 

About 1 in 4 born at 34 to 37 weeks' gestation developed respiratory disease by age 8, study finds

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
About 1 in 4 born at 34 to 37 weeks' gestation developed respiratory disease by age 8, study finds.

MONDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Babies born just a few weeks early appear to face a greater risk of developing asthma when compared with children born at full term, new research reveals.

The observation applied to infants born between the 34th and 37th week of pregnancy. One-quarter of such "late preterm" babies ended up with an asthma diagnosis by the age of 8 years, despite no prior indications of respiratory illness, the study team found. By contrast, just 15 percent of babies delivered after 37 weeks were found to develop asthma.

"About 10 percent of our babies are born at this [preterm] gestational age, and not much thought is given to their risk of asthma," study co-author Dr. Gretchen Matthews, a pediatrician and neonatologist at the Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn., explained in a news release from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI).

"What this shows us is that late preterm birth puts children at additional risk for asthma, and so we should initiate diagnosis earlier and maybe take preventive measures earlier," Matthews added. "It wasn't appreciated that this (late preterm) population was different. We can have a huge impact on asthma."

Matthews and her colleagues are to report their findings Monday at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, in Orlando, Fla.

The study authors noted that at least 5 million U.S. children are estimated to have asthma, which is now the most common chronic pediatric issue, and prevalence is on the rise.

Given that each year asthma attacks cause U.S. children to miss an estimated 14 million days of school, the Mayo Clinic team said that getting a better handle on factors related to improving early diagnosis could ultimately boost childhood quality of life, while also helping to hold down medical costs. The United States spends about $18 billion a year to treat and manage asthma, according to the AAAAI.

"If we can identify those children that are getting this at an earlier age, we can prevent missed days of school, missed parent workdays, perhaps even prevent some hospitalizations or hospital visits," said Matthews.

While the study uncovered an association between late preterm delivery and asthma in childhood, it did not prove a cause-and-effect.

Data and conclusions of research presented at medical meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

For more on childhood asthma, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCE: American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, news release, March 5, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Whole-Body CT Scans Can Miss Traumatic Injuries: Study Next: Youngest Kids in Class More Apt to Get ADHD Diagnosis: Study

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.