Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Gynecology | Infections | AIDS | News

Back to Health News

Bacterial Vaginosis Increases Female-to-Male HIV Transmission Risk

Last Updated: June 26, 2012.

 

HIV-positive women with the condition are three times more likely to pass virus to partners

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
HIV-positive women with the condition are three times more likely to pass virus to partners.

TUESDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-positive women with bacterial vaginosis, a disruption in the normal balance between healthy and harmful bacteria in the vagina, are three times more likely to pass HIV on to male sexual partners, according to a new study.

Researchers from the University of California-San Francisco, said new developments in treatment for bacterial vaginosis could not only improve women's health, but also help reduce HIV transmission rates.

"Previous research has shown that bacterial vaginosis can increase women's risk of becoming infected with HIV by as much as 60 percent," lead study author Dr. Craig Cohen, professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences, said in a university news release. "Our study is the first to show that the risk of transmitting HIV is also elevated."

In conducting the study, the researchers examined the link between bacterial vaginosis and female-to-male HIV transmission risk among more than 2,200 HIV-positive African women and their HIV-negative male partners.

After taking into account the participants' socio-demographic factors, sexual behavior, sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy and women's blood levels of HIV -- as well as whether their male partners were circumcised -- the researchers found bacterial vaginosis was still associated with a significantly higher risk for female-to-male transmission of HIV.

The researchers say it remains unclear exactly how bacterial vaginosis affects transmission rates.

"We looked at the increased shedding of HIV in the genital tract, but that was not sufficient to explain the increased risk of female-to-male HIV transmission," Cohen said. "It is also possible that bacterial vaginosis causes inflammation, and that could be a factor."

It is possible that sharing genital tract organisms between women and men could explain the higher HIV transmission risk, the researchers suggested.

"Our findings point to the need for additional research to improve the diagnosis and treatment of bacterial vaginosis, which is extremely common in sub-Saharan Africa, the region of the globe with the highest burden of HIV," Cohen said.

The study, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, was published June 26 in the journal PLoS Medicine.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides more information on bacterial vaginosis.

SOURCE: University of California-San Francisco, news release, June 26, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Certain Diets May Help Body Burn More Calories: Study Next: 'Atkins'-Type Diets May Raise Risk of Heart Problems: Study

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.