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Ovarian Transplants May Preserve Fertility in Young Cancer Survivors

Last Updated: July 06, 2012.

 

Grafts from frozen tissue restored hormone production for up to 7 years in small study

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Grafts from frozen tissue restored hormone production for up to 7 years in small study.

FRIDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Ovarian grafts -- frozen ovarian tissue that is thawed and transplanted back into a woman's body -- can help cancer survivors preserve their fertility, according to a small, new study.

Researchers from the University of Kansas Medical Center found that the grafts can produce hormones for more than seven years, a much longer lifespan than expected.

The study, led by Dr. Samuel Kim, associate professor in the reproductive endocrinology division of the department of obstetrics and gynecology, examined five cancer survivors who had rapidly thawed ovarian tissue transplanted back into their abdomens, a procedure known as heterotopic ovarian transplantation.

The levels and function of the reproductive hormones in the women were measured by monthly blood tests and ultrasounds.

The researchers found that four of the women needed a second transplantation within two years. Following the second transplant, however, ovarian function was restored faster and lasted longer -- from nine months up to seven years.

"Re-establishment of long-term endocrine function after ovarian transplantation will benefit young cancer survivors with premature ovarian failure," Kim concluded.

The study was recently published online in the Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics.

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more about ovarian cancer.

SOURCE: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics, news release, June 28, 2012.

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Can Fertility Treatments Influence Later Breast Cancer Risk? Next: Keep Infants Out of Sun and Heat, Experts Warn

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