Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Oncology | Pediatrics | Pharmacy | Nutrition | Preventive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

FDA Bans BPA From Baby Bottles, Sippy Cups

Last Updated: July 17, 2012.

 

Move comes after industry request for 'clarification,' but consumer advocates say it's not enough

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Move comes after industry request for 'clarification,' but consumer advocates say it's not enough.

TUESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- The controversial plastics chemical bisphenol A (BPA) is now banned for use in baby bottles and sippy cups, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday.

The move was prompted by a request in October from the American Chemistry Council, which represents industry, as a way to clarify for consumers that BPA will not be found in these items.

BPA has a checkered history, with many consumer advocate groups pointing to studies suggesting the chemical might disrupt hormones and trigger a host of unhealthy changes in children and adults, including cancer, obesity and developmental/reproductive problems.

In its ruling, the FDA said that, effective Tuesday, it is now banning BPA-containing resins in "infant feeding bottles [baby bottles] and spill-proof cups, including their closures and lids, designed to help train babies and toddlers to drink from cups [sippy cups]."

In a news release, the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) applauded the move but said it still offers consumers only "limited protections."

Because BPA is found elsewhere in plastics, the FDA move "still leaves the public exposed to the hormone-disrupting chemical in food packaging," the NRDC said.

"This is only a baby step in the fight to eradicate BPA," NRDC senior scientist Dr. Sarah Janssen said in the release. "To truly protect the public, FDA needs to ban BPA from all food packaging. This half-hearted action -- taken only after consumers shifted away from BPA in children's products -- is inadequate. [The] FDA continues to dodge the bigger questions of BPA's safety."

For its part, the American Chemistry Council (ACC) defended the safety of BPA in a statement released Tuesday. "BPA is one of the most thoroughly tested chemicals in commerce today. The consensus of government agencies across the world is that BPA is safe for use in food-contact materials, including those intended for infants and toddlers."

In the statement, ACC spokesman Steven Hentges said the FDA baby bottle/sippy cup ban was necessary because "confusion about whether BPA is used in baby bottles and sippy cups had become an unnecessary distraction to consumers, legislators and state regulators."

The ACC noted that "manufacturers of baby bottles and sippy cups announced several years ago that due to consumer preference they had stopped using BPA in these products."

But according to the NRDC, the fight to eliminate BPA from all products continues.

"In March, FDA rejected NRDC's petition to ban BPA in all food packaging, but the agency emphasized it was not making a final determination of BPA's safety," the group said. "Instead, it would continue to examine the ongoing research of BPA's effects on health."

In the meantime, the NRDC said, while some canned food manufacturers have voluntarily removed BPA from can linings, its use in food and beverage cans remains legal.

More information

The full FDA ruling can be found at the U.S. Federal Register.

SOURCES: July 17, 2012, news releases, National Resources Defense Council, American Chemistry Council; U.S. Federal Register, U.S. Food and Drug Administration announcement, July 17, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: U.S. Doctors Embracing Electronic Health Records: Survey Next: Hospitals for Poor May Struggle Further Under Health Care Reform

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.