Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Neurology | Preventive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

Adding More Neurosurgeons Could Cut Traffic Deaths: Study

Last Updated: July 24, 2012.

 

Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death among people aged 34 and younger

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death among people aged 34 and younger.

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Greater availability of neurosurgeons could reduce the number of people who die from brain injuries suffered in traffic crashes, according to a new study.

Motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of death in the United States among people 34 years old and younger. Traumatic brain injury is the primary cause of death among people injured in car accidents; treatment of brain injuries is generally handled by neurosurgeons.

In this study, Dr. Atman Desai and colleagues from Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, N.H., examined data from more than 3,100 rural and urban counties across the United States between 2004 and 2006. The average rate of car-crash-related deaths, they found, was 226 per 1 million people.

The largest number of neurosurgeons in a county was 372, the researchers discovered, but most counties had no such doctors.

The researchers calculated that an increase of one neurosurgeon per 1 million people would lead to between one and two fewer deaths from car accidents per 1 million people. This was true whether the county was rural or urban.

To achieve the same reduction in deaths would require an additional 33 primary care doctors or an additional six general surgeons per 1 million people, the researchers said.

The findings indicate that the availability of local neurosurgeons may improve a person's chances of surviving a car crash, and suggest the need to encourage medical students to choose neurosurgery as a career, the researchers concluded.

The study was published online July 24 in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about traumatic brain injury.

SOURCE: Journal of Neurosurgery, news release, July 24, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Tudorza Pressair Approved for COPD Next: Need to Get Walking More? Clip on a Pedometer

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.