Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Research | Preventive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

Black Teens in Public Housing Twice As Likely to Smoke: Study

Last Updated: July 24, 2012.

 

Smoking prevention programs should target young children in these communities, researchers say

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Smoking prevention programs should target young children in these communities, researchers say.

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Black teens living in public housing communities are more than twice as likely to smoke as their peers in other U.S. communities, researchers have found.

The findings, published in the August issue of Addictive Behaviors, suggest that early interventions are needed to prevent young people in these communities from lighting up.

"Compared to their same-aged peers, youth living in public housing were more likely to use tobacco and have positive attitudes about using tobacco," researcher Mansoo Yu, an assistant professor of social work and public health in the MU College of Human Environmental Sciences, said in a University of Missouri news release.

"As previous research suggests, early use of tobacco increases individuals' chances of using more serious drugs later. In addition, early drug use is related to other serious problems, such as delinquent behaviors, and family and social problems," Yu added.

In conducting the study, Yu and colleagues from the University of Illinois at Chicago, Boston College and the University of South Carolina asked 518 black teenagers living in public housing in three large U.S. cities about their attitudes on tobacco use, symptoms of depression and delinquent behaviors.

The study authors found that these teens were 2.3 times more likely to use tobacco than other black teens. The investigators pointed out that teens living in public housing may be more afraid, have poorer social relationships and more psychological strain, which could contribute to the higher rates of smoking.

"Smoking cessation programs for young African-Americans living in public housing communities should focus on reversing their positive attitudes toward tobacco use," Yu said in the news release. "In addition, programs should help address the youths' depressive symptoms and keep them from getting involved in delinquent behaviors."

The researchers added that smoking prevention programs in public housing communities should target young children.

"Early interventions are critical for these individuals since the likelihood of being exposed to risky behaviors dramatically increases as the children age," explained Yu. "In public housing communities, adolescents may have easier access to drugs and social activities where drugs are used."

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about young people and tobacco use.

SOURCE: University of Missouri, news release, July 10, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Neglect May Harm Brain Growth in Children Next: Teaching Young Hockey Players to Body Check Doesn't Decrease Risk of Injury

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.