Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Pediatrics | Dependence | Preventive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

Rising Cigarette Prices May Be Incentive to Quit

Last Updated: July 31, 2012.

 

Doctor offers tips for those who are ready to kick the habit

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Doctor offers tips for those who are ready to kick the habit.

TUESDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The recent increase in the Illinois cigarette tax is an example of how making smoking more expensive can convince some people it's time to quit.

For example, being a smoker in Chicago can easily cost $300 a month, which is more than twice as expensive as a monthly prescription of medications to help a person quit smoking.

But even when the cost of smoking convinces a person to quit, it can be hard to kick the habit, said Dr. Phillip McAndrew, an internal medicine physician and occupational health expert at Loyola University Health System.

"Nicotine really is that addictive. It's a hard battle, but every one that we win, including increasing the cost of cigarettes through taxes, brings individual smokers to the tipping point where the pain of smoking overcomes the joys of nicotine and they quit," McAndrew noted. "The tipping point could be a life-altering health experience, but often it's the impact on the pocketbook that makes people really consider quitting," he explained in a Loyola news release.

"To quit you need the time and teamwork approach. Don't expect to do it overnight and you need a team of support around you to cheer you on. That team captain should be your physician," McAndrew said.

"Nicotine is too strong an opponent for someone to go it alone. You need that team to help keep you on track when everything inside of you wants to go back," he advised.

McAndrew offered the following tips to help people quit smoking:

  • Assemble a support team that includes your family, doctor, friends and co-workers.
  • Set a specific date to quit. Make it two to four weeks away so that you have time to prepare. When quit day arrives, make sure to celebrate it.
  • Make preparations to limit the temptation of nicotine while you try to quit. Talk to your doctor about medications and other methods to help you; buy gum, carrot sticks or other snacks to keep your mouth busy; get rid of all cigarettes, matches, lighters and ashtrays from your home, office, car and other locations where you smoke; clean your clothes, home and car so they don't smell like smoke; program your phone with resources such as tobacco "quit lines."
  • Find ways to cope with stress and boredom, which can trigger a return to smoking.
  • Keep doing enjoyable things you used to connect with smoking, such as taking a break or going out with friends. That will help you break the mental link between these pleasant activities and smoking.

More information

The American Cancer Society offers a guide to quitting smoking.

SOURCE: Loyola University Health System, news release, July 26, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Menstrual Cycles May Affect Women's Shopping Patterns Next: Depression Rates Rise for Girls During Teen Years

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.