Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Neurology | Rheumatology | Nutrition | News

Back to Health News

Low Vitamin D Levels May Raise Death Risk in Older Adults: Study

Last Updated: August 03, 2012.

 

Although cause and effect not proven, frail seniors appeared most vulnerable

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Although cause and effect not proven, frail seniors appeared most vulnerable.

FRIDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults with low vitamin D levels -- especially those who are frail -- have an increased risk of death.

That's the finding of Oregon State University researchers who analyzed data from a survey of more than 4,300 U.S. adults older than 60.

Those with low vitamin D levels had a 30 percent greater risk of death during the study period than those with higher levels. Frail people had more than double the risk of death than those who were not frail. And those who were both frail and had low vitamin D levels were three times more likely to die than those who were not frail and had higher vitamin D levels.

The study was published online recently in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

"What this really means is that it is important to assess vitamin D levels in older adults, and especially among people who are frail," lead author and nutritional epidemiologist Ellen Smit said in a university news release. "Older adults need to be screened for vitamin D."

The researchers could not determine whether low vitamin D levels contributed to frailty or if frail people had low vitamin D levels due to health problems, but that may not be important, the researchers said.

"If you have both, it may not really matter which came first because you are worse off and at greater risk of dying than other older people who are frail and who don't have low vitamin D," Smit said.

"This is an important finding because we already know there is a biological basis for this," she concluded. "Vitamin D impacts muscle function and bones, so it makes sense that it plays a big role in frailty."

According to the news release, about 70 percent of Americans and up to 1 billion people worldwide have insufficient levels of vitamin D, which the body produces in response to sun exposure. Other sources of vitamin D include certain foods and supplements.

Although the study found an association between vitamin D levels and death risk in older adults, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

The Harvard School of Public Health has more about vitamin D and health.

SOURCE: Oregon State University, news release, July 26, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: CDC Preparing Vaccine for New Swine Flu Next: Living Without Lies Might Make You Healthier

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.