Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Infections | Pediatrics | Preventive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

Vaccinations Belong on Parents’ Back-to-School Checklists

Last Updated: August 20, 2012.

 

Preventable diseases can threaten children's lives, expert warns

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Preventable diseases can threaten children's lives, expert warns.

MONDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccinations among school-aged children can save lives and parents should be sure their children are fully immunized as part of their back-to-school preparations, according to a pediatric infectious disease specialist.

"These vaccines save children's lives; parents interested in keeping their child alive should have them vaccinated," Dr. David Kimberlin, a University of Alabama at Birmingham professor of pediatrics, said in a university news release. "At any given time, all of these vaccine-preventable diseases are at most 18 hours away. For example, one of the few remaining places where polio circulates is Afghanistan, and U.S. troops return home from there daily; anyone exposed could inadvertently pass polio to a child."

Kimberlin is also president-elect of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports there are 16 diseases currently preventable with childhood vaccines, including chickenpox (varicella), diphtheria, seasonal flu, Haemophilus influenza type b, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, human papillomavirus, measles, meningococcal, mumps, pneumococcal, rotavirus, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis) and polio.

During his medical training, Kimberlin recalled, he witnessed a 10-year-old girl suffering from polio because she was never immunized against the viral infection. Vaccinations, he noted, could also prevent the spread of illnesses to others who are more vulnerable, such as infants.

"School-age children don't die from pertussis, but babies do. If an unvaccinated 12-year-old vacations in Washington and comes in contact with the disease, they can bring it home and inadvertently kill a baby under 12 months old," Kimberlin explained.

"People do have all sorts of fears of things they don't understand, but there is no rational reason for not vaccinating a child," Vivian Friedman, a clinical psychologist and professor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham's department of psychiatry and behavioral neurobiology, said in the release.

She added that small incentives could help reluctant children cooperate and receive the necessary shots.

"My own daughter was seriously ill from the ages of 4 to 10; she not only had painful shots but also painful procedures. So for every bad thing that happened to her, we made a good thing happen," Friedman said. "For every blood test my daughter got, we took her to the dollar store to choose anything she wanted. It's inexpensive and varied enough that it can work as a motivator and reward."

More information

Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to learn more about vaccines.

SOURCE: University of Alabama at Birmingham, news release, Aug. 10, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Health Highlights: Aug. 20, 2012 Next: College Students Who Binge Drink Say They're Happier

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.