Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Infections | Oncology | Pediatrics | Reproductive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

New Evidence Supports HPV Vaccine

Last Updated: July 07, 2009.

 

Industry-funded study showed high levels of protection against human papillomavirus

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Industry-funded study showed high levels of protection against human papillomavirus.

MONDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is highly effective at preventing precancerous cervical lesions that can lead to cervical cancer, a new study shows.

The researchers also found that the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine also appears to protect against other cancer-causing HPV types closely related to HPV-16/18, most notably HPV-31 and HPV-45.

The study of women aged 15 to 25, who received three vaccine doses over six months, found that it was as much as 98 percent effective against HPV-16/18, and between 37 percent and 54 percent effective against 12 other cancer-causing HPV types.

HPV-16/18 causes about 70 percent of cervical cancer cases, while the remaining 30 percent of cases are caused by other cancer-causing HPV types. The cross-protective effect of the HPV-16/18 vaccine could provide an additional 11 percent to 16 percent protection against cervical cancer.

"Although the importance of continued tests for Pap or HPV in vaccinated and unvaccinated women must be emphasized, HPV vaccination has the potential to substantially reduce the incidence of cervical cancer and precancer, and the numbers of colposcopy referrals and cervical excision procedures," concluded Dr. Jorma Paavonen, of the University of Helsinki in Finland, and colleagues.

The study, which was funded by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, maker of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine Cervarix, appears online July 7 and in an upcoming print issue of The Lancet.

In an accompanying editorial, two experts wrote that men must also be included in efforts to halt the spread of HPV.

"Currently, the targets for HPV vaccination are girls and young women aged 11 to 26 years prior to sexual debut," noted Karin B. Michels, of Harvard Medical School in Boston, and Dr. Harald zur Hausen, of the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg.

"While good utilization of the [vaccine] program will reduce cervical cancer incidence in a couple of decades, this subgroup of the population at risk is too small to limit the spread of the virus," the researchers wrote. "The only efficient way to stop the virus is to also vaccinate the other half of the sexually active population: boys and men."

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about HPV and cervical cancer.

SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, July 6, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: Despite More Tests, Some Aren't Getting Results Next: Final Rules Broaden Pool for Stem Cell Research

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.