Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Infections | News

Back to Health News

‘Alarming’ Rise Seen in Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

Last Updated: August 30, 2012.

 

International study found TB withstanding multiple types of antibiotics

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
International study found TB withstanding multiple types of antibiotics.

THURSDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- There are alarmingly high levels of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in many areas of the world, a new study finds.

Researchers found high rates of resistance to at least one second-line drug (nearly 44 percent) among multidrug-resistant TB patients in eight countries in Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America. They also found higher-than-expected overall levels of extensively drug-resistant TB.

Multidrug-resistant TB can withstand to at least two first-line drugs: soniazid and rifampicin. Extensively drug-resistant TB is resistant to isoniazid, rifampicin, a fluoroquinolone and a second-line injectable drug.

Fluoroquinolones are a class of antibiotics that include ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and gatifloxacin.

For the study, samples collected from nearly 1,300 adults with multidrug-resistant TB in Estonia, Latvia, Peru, the Philippines, Russia, South Africa, South Korea and Thailand were tested for resistance to 11 first-line and second-line anti-TB drugs. Overall, in nearly 44 percent of patients, resistance to any second-line drug was detected. Rates ranged from 33 percent in Thailand to 62 percent in Latvia.

Overall, one-fifth of patients had resistance to at least one second-line injectable drug, ranging from 2 percent in the Philippines to 47 percent in Latvia. The overall rate of resistance to a fluoroquinolone was nearly 13 percent, ranging from 7 percent in the Philippines to 32 percent in South Korea.

Extensively drug-resistant TB was found in 6.7 percent of patients overall, with prevalence in South Korea (15 percent) and Russia (11 percent) more than twice the current World Health Organization estimate for the same time period (5.4 percent).

The researchers also found that the risk of extensively drug-resistant TB was more than four times higher in patients previously treated for TB, and that previous treatment with second-line drugs was the strongest risk factor for resistance.

The study was published online Aug. 29 in The Lancet.

"Drug-resistant TB is more difficult and costly to treat, and more often fatal. Internationally, it is particularly worrisome in areas with fewer resources and less access to effective therapies. As more individuals are diagnosed with, and treated for, drug-resistant TB, more resistance to second-line drugs is expected to emerge," lead author Tracy Dalton, of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said in a journal news release.

"So far, [extensively drug-resistant] TB has been reported in 77 countries worldwide, but exact prevalence remains unclear," Dalton noted.

"Most international recommendations for TB control have been developed for [multidrug-resistant] TB prevalence of up to around 5 percent. Yet now we face prevalence up to 10 times higher in some places, where almost half of the patients with infectious disease are transmitting [multidrug-resistant] strains," Sven Hoffner, from the Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, wrote in an accompanying journal editorial.

"Updated information on [multidrug-resistant] TB and investigation of the trends are urgently needed...especially since the true scale of the burden of [multidrug-resistant] and [extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis] might be underestimated and seem to be rapidly increasing," he wrote.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about TB.

SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, Aug. 29, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: New Drug Approved for Lack of Certain White Blood Cells Next: Multiple Abortions May Raise Risk of Preemie Birth Later

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.