Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Pediatrics | Sports Medicine | Preventive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

Keeping Up a Healthy Lifestyle Pays Off in Added Years: Study

Last Updated: August 31, 2012.

 

Seniors who keep active and don't smoke live an average 5 years longer, researchers say

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Seniors who keep active and don't smoke live an average 5 years longer, researchers say.

FRIDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- So how much of a benefit might you get from exercising, eating right and avoiding vices like smoking? New research from Sweden suggests that healthy living into old age can boost life spans by several years.

The study sought to determine how healthy living affects people aged 75 or older. The researchers, from the Karolinska Institute and Stockholm University, followed more than 1,800 people for 18 years, from 1987 to 2005, and kept tabs on their life choices, social networks and leisure activities, among other things.

Although 92 percent died during the study period, half lived to be more than 90 years old, according to the report published online Aug. 30 in the BMJ.

Women, people who were highly educated, those who had stronger social networks, took part in leisure activities and maintained healthy lifestyles were most likely to live longer, the investigators found.

Smokers died, on average, a year before nonsmokers. But those who quit earlier survived about as long as those who'd never smoked, study author Debora Rizzuto and colleagues pointed out in a journal news release.

People who exercised on a regular basis -- including swimming and walking -- lived two years longer on average than those who didn't. And those who had the healthiest lifestyles overall lived 5.4 years, on average, more than those with the unhealthiest lifestyles.

"Even among the oldest old (85 years or older) and people with chronic conditions, the median age at death was four years higher for those with a low-risk profile compared with those with a high-risk profile," the study authors wrote in the report.

More information

For details about healthy living, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCE: BMJ, news release, Aug. 30, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: More Baby Boomers Opting to Cohabit, Not Marry Next: Kidney Stones May Be Tied to Later Kidney Problems

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.