Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Preventive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

People More Likely to Guzzle Beer Served in Curved Glasses

Last Updated: September 04, 2012.

 

Study finds 'beer flutes' make it harder for drinkers to pace themselves

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Study finds 'beer flutes' make it harder for drinkers to pace themselves.

TUESDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Bar owners might be interested in a new study that shows people drink alcohol more rapidly from curved "beer flutes," compared to their consumption from straight-sided glasses.

Researchers led by Dr. Angela Attwood from the University of Bristol, in England, asked 160 social drinkers aged 18 to 40 to make decisions about drinking.

In one experiment, they were asked to drink either lager or a soft drink from either a straight-sided glass or a curved beer glass.

When they drank beer from the straight-sided glass, they were almost twice as slow as when they drank from the beer glass. There was no difference in how rapidly they drank the soft drink.

The researchers think this may have something to do with how the curved glasses make it hard for drinkers to figure out how much they've consumed.

In another experiment, participants looked at pictures of the two glasses with different levels of liquid and tried to determine whether they were more or less than half full. Their estimates were off by a greater extent when they looked at the curved glasses.

"People often talk of 'pacing themselves' when drinking alcohol as a means of controlling levels of drunkenness, and I think the important point to take from our research is that the ability to pace effectively may be compromised when drinking from certain types of glasses," said Atwood in a university news release.

The study recently appeared in the journal PLoS ONE.

More information

For more about alcohol, try the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCE: University of Bristol, news release, Aug. 31, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Combat Stress Linked to Brain Changes in Study Next: Could Internet Addiction Be Genetic?

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.